The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Nursing Assistant

(Y6S1) ELDER Project: Palliative Care - Basic Principles

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This session is based on the ELNEC (End of Life Nursing Educational Consortium) curriculum and contains activities and information regarding best practices in end of life care. The module focuses on basic principles of palliative care including dying well, sources of suffering, life closure, quality of life, causes of death, interdisciplinary teams, and hospice services and billing. There are several suggested group activities. Both licensed and unlicensed professionals are the target audience.

Educational objectives: 
By the end of the session, the participant will be able to:
  1. Discuss the concept of “dying well” and how it applies to end-of-life (EOL) care.
  2. Compare and contrast the concepts of palliative care and hospice care.
  3. Describe the role of the health care team in providing quality palliative care for elder patients in various care settings.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

City of Hope & the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2007; Revised, 2010. The End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC)- Geriatric Training Program and Curriculum is a project of the City of Hope (Betty R. Ferrell, PhD, FAAN, Principal Investigator) in collaboration with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (Pam Malloy, RN, MN, OCN, Co-Investigator).

American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2009). End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) Factsheet. Retrieved February 9, 2009, from http://www.aacn.nche.edu/elnec/about.htm
Wilkie, D. J., Judge, M. K., Wells, M. J., & Berkley, I. M. (2001). Excellence in teaching end-of-life care: A new multimedia toolkit for nurse educators. Nursing and Health Care Perspectives, 22, 226 -230.

http://www.ct.gov/longtermcare/cwp/view.asp?a=1398...
©2001 D.J. Wilkie & TNEEL Investigators

Date posted: 
Mon, 06/25/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 06/25/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y6S1) ELDER Project: Palliative Care - Basic Principles. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/466

(Y5SJI) ELDER Project: Cultural Diversity: Judaism and Islam

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

 


Both licensed and unlicensed participants discuss the role of religion, traditional health care beliefs, social values, and family structure of several different cultures and the impact these factors have on health care.



Educational objectives
  1.  
Educational objectives: 
  1. Compare and contrast the belief systems of Judaism and Islam.
  2. Discuss the role of religion, traditional health care beliefs, social values, and family structure of Judaism and Islam and the impact these factors have on health care.
  3. Identify specific culturally sensitive practices that can be incorporated into your work with Jewish and Muslim patients.
  4. Define culture and how it is reflected in our everyday lives.
  5. Distinguish between visible and invisible aspects of culture.
  6. Explain how the invisible aspects of culture influence the visible aspects of culture.
  7. Specific cultures include African American, Hispanic, Asian Indian, Jewish, Islam, Vietnamese, and Russian.
  8. Define and discuss components associated with cultural competence.
  9. Acknowledge healthcare disparities amongst cultures within healthcare.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

 

Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sun, 12/18/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y5SJI) ELDER Project: Cultural Diversity: Judaism and Islam. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/466

(Y5SH) ELDER Project: Cultural Diversity: Haitian Culture

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Both licensed and unlicensed participants discuss the role of religion, traditional health care beliefs, social values, and family structure of several different cultures and the impact these factors have on health care.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Discuss the role of religion, traditional health care beliefs, social values, and family structure of Haitian Culture and the impact these factors have on health care.
  2. Identify specific culturally sensitive practices that can be incorporated into your work with Haitian patients and American Haitian patients.
  3. Define culture and how it is reflected in our everyday lives.
  4. Distinguish between visible and invisible aspects of culture.
  5. Explain how the invisible aspects of culture influence the visible aspects of culture.
  6. Specific cultures include African American, Hispanic, Asian Indian, Jewish, Islam, Vietnamese, and Russian.
  7. Define and discuss components associated with cultural competence.
  8. Acknowledge healthcare disparities amongst cultures within healthcare.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

 

  1. The Ethno geriatric Curriculum from the RIGEC (Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center) website. · http://www.uri.edu/outreach/rigec/minority_health.html
  1. Online course designed to foster cultural competence among nurses supported by the Office of Minority Health; ·American Institutes for Research. (2002). Teaching cultural competence in health care: A review of current concepts, policies and practices. Report prepared for the Office of Minority Health. Washington, DC: Author.
  1. A Georgetown-based series on cultural awareness, self-assessment and personal identity, and communication in a multicultural environment - Gilbert, J., Goode, T. D., & Dunne, C. (2007). Cultural awareness. From the Curricula Enhancement Module Series. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development.   
  1. On-line learning experience on health literacy, Unified Health Communication 101: Addressing Health Literacy, Cultural Competency, and Limited English Proficiency, supported by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) - Links to the Tool: This tool is available at: http://www.hrsa.gov/publichealth/healthliteracy/
  1. Bernal, H.,  & Froman, R. (1993) Influences on the cultural self-efficacy of community health nurses. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 4 (2), 24-31.
  1. Camphina-Bacote, J. (2008). The process of cultural competence in the delivery of healthcare services. Retrieved December 1, 2008 from: http://www.transculturalcare.net/Publications.htm
  1. Office of Minority Health. (2007). National standards on Culturally and linguistically appropriate services (CLAS). Retrieved December 15, 2008 from http://www.omhrc.gov/templates/browse.aspx?lvl=2&lvlID=15
  1. A comprehensive curriculum in the health care of elders from diverse ethnic populations for training in all health care disciplines. It was developed by representatives from over 30 Geriatric Education Centers and includes five Core Curriculum modules and eleven Ethnic Specific Modules to be used in conjunction with the Core Curriculum. Available at http://www.stanford.edu/group/ethnoger/index.html.
  1. National Center for Cultural Competence Curricula Enhancement Module Series.  Cultural Awareness.  Retrieved on June 28th, 2010 from http://www.nccccurricula.info/awareness/index.html.  

 

Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sun, 12/18/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y5SH) ELDER Project: Cultural Diversity: Haitian Culture. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/466

(Y5SAA) ELDER Project: Cultural Diversity: African American Culture

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

ELDER Project, Year 5 of 6: This is session 7 of 13 focused on culture, and is designed to teach licensed and unlicensed health care professionals about the African American Culture. Content includes the role of religion, traditional health care beliefs, social values, and family structure and their impact on health.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Discuss the role of religion, traditional health care beliefs, social values, and family structure of African Americans and the impact these factors have on health care.
  2. Identify specific culturally sensitive practices that can be incorporated into your work with African American patients.
  3. Examine historical influences that shape the attitudes of some African Americans in relation to current day healthcare.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

 

  1. The Ethno geriatric Curriculum from the RIGEC (Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center) website. · http://www.uri.edu/outreach/rigec/minority_health.html
  1. Online course designed to foster cultural competence among nurses supported by the Office of Minority Health; ·American Institutes for Research. (2002). Teaching cultural competence in health care: A review of current concepts, policies and practices. Report prepared for the Office of Minority Health. Washington, DC: Author.
  1. A Georgetown-based series on cultural awareness, self-assessment and personal identity, and communication in a multicultural environment - Gilbert, J., Goode, T. D., & Dunne, C. (2007). Cultural awareness. From the Curricula Enhancement Module Series. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development.
  1. On-line learning experience on health literacy, Unified Health Communication 101: Addressing Health Literacy, Cultural Competency, and Limited English Proficiency, supported by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) - Links to the Tool: This tool is available at: http://www.hrsa.gov/publichealth/healthliteracy/
  1. Bernal, H.,  & Froman, R. (1993) Influences on the cultural self-efficacy of community health nurses. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 4 (2), 24-31.
  1. Camphina-Bacote, J. (2008). The process of cultural competence in the delivery of healthcare services. Retrieved December 1, 2008 from: http://www.transculturalcare.net/Publications.htm
  1. Office of Minority Health. (2007). National standards on Culturally and linguistically appropriate services (CLAS). Retrieved December 15, 2008 from http://www.omhrc.gov/templates/browse.aspx?lvl=2&lvlID=15
  1. A comprehensive curriculum in the health care of elders from diverse ethnic populations for training in all health care disciplines. It was developed by representatives from over 30 Geriatric Education Centers and includes five Core Curriculum modules and eleven Ethnic Specific Modules to be used in conjunction with the Core Curriculum. Available at http://www.stanford.edu/group/ethnoger/index.html.
  1. National Center for Cultural Competence Curricula Enhancement Module Series.  Cultural Awareness.  Retrieved on June 28th, 2010 from http://www.nccccurricula.info/awareness/index.html.

 

Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 04/30/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y5SAA) ELDER Project: Cultural Diversity: African American Culture. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/466

(Y4S5) ELDER Project Teams and Teamwork: Leadership

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This module begins to explore the importance and benefits of working as a collaborative team within the geriatric setting. Working as a team achieves resutls with geriatric patients that individuals within the team can not achieve in isolation.  Session five focuses on leadership within teams, and topics include: views on leadership; leadership styles; shifts of leadership within a team; functions and tasks of the leader. Activities include having the team create one picture from fragments of pictures without talking.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Discuss current views on leadership.
  2. Examine1 the shift of leadership on teams.
  3. Identify functions of leadership.
  4. Describe leadership tasks and maintenance functions of an effective interdisciplinary team.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

GITT Resource Center of the John A. Hartford Foundation Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training Program. (2003). GITT. New York: New York

Tower Building Activity: For Team Building developed by: Donald E. Gibson, Ph.D., Professor of Management, Chair, Management Department, Charles F. Dolan School of Business, Fairfield University

Zoom. Banyai (1995).New York: Viking/Penguin

Re-Zoom.  Banyai, I (1998). New York: Viking/Penguin

Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sun, 12/18/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y4S5) ELDER Project Teams and Teamwork: Leadership. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/466

(Y4S4) ELDER Project Teams and Teamwork: Communication

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This module begins to explore the importance and benefits of working as a collaborative team within the geriatric setting. Working as a team achieves results with geriatric patients that individuals within the team cannot achieve in isolation.  Session four includes topics such as identification of barriers to communication, use of effective communication, and use of diverse styles of communication to contribute to team function. A coaching exercise is included in the materials.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Identify barriers that affect communication exchange among providers, patients, their families, and communities.
  2. Examine some effective communication tools and techniques that will contribute to good team function.
  3. Describe how diverse styles of communication contribute to team function. 
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

GITT Resource Center of the John A. Hartford Foundation Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training Program. (2003). GITT. New York: New York

Tower Building Activity: For Team Building developed by: Donald E. Gibson, Ph.D., Professor of Management, Chair, Management Department, Charles F. Dolan School of Business, Fairfield University

Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sun, 12/18/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y4S4) ELDER Project Teams and Teamwork: Communication. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/466

(Y4S3) ELDER Project Teams and Teamwork: Team Member Roles

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This module begins to explore the importance and benefits of working as a collaborative team within the geriatric setting. Working as a team achieves resutls with geriatric patients that individuals within the team can not achieve in isolation.  Session three focuses on the various roles and their function within a team; topics inlcude identification of team members and roles; team function; and overlap of roles within the team.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Identify characteristics of effective teams.
  2. List the members of the interdisciplinary team.
  3. Compare and contrast the different functions of various disciplines within the team.
  4. Describe role overlap and its implication in patient care.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

 

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

GITT Resource Center of the John A. Hartford Foundation Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training Program. (2003). GITT. New York: New York

Tower Building Activity: For Team Building developed by: Donald E. Gibson, Ph.D., Professor of Management, Chair, Management Department, Charles F. Dolan School of Business, Fairfield University

Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sun, 12/18/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y4S3) ELDER Project Teams and Teamwork: Team Member Roles. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/466

(Y4S2) ELDER Project Teams and Teamwork: Continued

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This module begins to explore the importance and benefits of working as a collaborative team within the geriatric setting. Working as a team achieves resutls with geriatric patients that individuals within the team can not achieve in isolation.  Session two covers topics such as : phases of team development; and successful versus unsuccessful teams. This session is a continuation of session one, which covered topics such as collaborative practice and the importance of being part of an interdisciplinary team.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Discuss the phases of team development.
  2. Compare and contrast the components of successful vs. unsuccessful team development in a given case scenario.

 

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

GITT Resource Center of the John A. Hartford Foundation Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training Program. (2003). GITT. New York: New York

Tower Building Activity: For Team Building developed by: Donald E. Gibson, Ph.D., Professor of Management, Chair, Management Department, Charles F. Dolan School of Business, Fairfield University

Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sun, 12/18/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y4S2) ELDER Project Teams and Teamwork: Continued. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/466

(Y4S1) ELDER Project Teams and Teamwork: Introduction

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This module begins to explore the importance and benefits of working as a collaborative team within the geriatric setting. Working as a team achieves resutls with geriatric patients that individuals within the team can not achieve in isolation.  Topics in session 1 include collaborative practice; working as an interdisciplinary team and exploration of the different types of teams.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Discuss the elements of collaborative practice.
  2. Identify the need for and importance of collaboration and interdisciplinary teams.
  3. Describe the different types of teams.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

GITT Resource Center of the John A. Hartford Foundation Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training Program. (2003). GITT. New York: New York

Tower Building Activity: For Team Building developed by: Donald E. Gibson, Ph.D., Professor of Management, Chair, Management Department, Charles F. Dolan School of Business, Fairfield University

Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 02/26/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y4S1) ELDER Project Teams and Teamwork: Introduction. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/466

(Y2S6) ELDER Project: Falls and Restraints

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Sponsors: 
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Year 2 - Target audience is Nursing Assistants (NA) in the homecare and long term care settings. The curriculum is based on the John A. Hartford Foundation's best practices in the care of older adults. This is session six of six, and it contains two modules: Falls and Restraints.  Falls topics include: reasons patients are at risk for falls; how nursing assistants are instrumental in fall prevention; Restraint topics include: role of NA in restraint use; and myths/facts about restraints.

Educational objectives: 

Educational Objectives Session 6:

  1. List three reasons that patients may be at risk for falls.
  2. Name three things that a nursing assistant can do to help prevent a fall for an older adult.
  3. List one myth and fact about the use of restraints for older adults.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 
 
John A. Hartford Foundation Institute for Geriatric Nursing (2001, 2003)
Mather LifeWays, 2003
Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 02/19/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y2S6) ELDER Project: Falls and Restraints. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/466

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