The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Standardized Patient

A clinical scenario designed to be portrayed by actors for the purpose of instruction or assessment.

Establishing goals of care- Standardized caregiver interview

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This Observed Standardized Caregiver (SCG) interview is designed to be used with geriatric fellows. The goal is to assess the fellow's competence in establishing goals of care with patient’s families in the ambulatory setting. 

Educational objectives: 

The case is designed to evaluate geriatric fellow’s ability to elicit the following core competencies in geriatrics assessment during a Standardized Patient Interview:
1. Establish that the caregiver is the appropriate health care designee
2. Introduce the need to have a discussion about overall goals of care
3. Establish what would be an acceptable quality of life for the patient
4. Assist the family with completing a written health care directive ( for this exercise a Practitioner Order of Life Sustaining Treatment  form - POLST )
 

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 


This exercise can be integrated into an ongoing geriatrics curriculum for geriatric fellows.
• An overview of the educational goals and patient characteristics is discussed with the fellow(s) prior to the session (15 minutes)
• Training of SCG (30 minutes)
• The fellow(s) are videotaped performing a caregiver interview (30 minutes)
• The fellow(s)complete a self-assessment tool (3 minutes)
• The SCG completes a fellow(s) assessment tool (3 minutes)
• The videotape is reviewed by the faculty with a standardized assessment tool (20 minutes)
• A group session to provide formative feedback is conducted with geriatrics faculty
 

Date posted: 
Thu, 11/16/2017
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 11/01/2017
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Establishing goals of care- Standardized caregiver interview. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2017 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/42

Barney Smith - A Progressive Palliative Care Standardized Patient

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Abstract: 

This six part progressive standardized patent serves re train medical students to care for an older adult with a life limiting condition, including making the diagnosis of multiple myeloma, breaking bad news, transitions of care from the hospital to home and curative care to palliation, through advance directiive discussions, and eventually into hospice and his death. The six encounters occur from Year 2 through Year 4 of the medical school curriculum , with a scripted five year span of patient care. Educational modalities include standandized patients, simulation, web-based modules, and small group discussions. 

Educational objectives: 

1) Provide medical care for an older adult with a life limiting condition from their diagnosis through their death

2) Understand the roles of the medical provider and other health care disciplines, as individual providers and as a team, in caring for an older adult with a life limiting diagnosis as they transition from the hospital to home and from curative care to palliation

3) Assist family caregivers in identifying caregiver responsibilities and potential caregiver burden

Date posted: 
Mon, 10/17/2016
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 10/17/2016
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Barney Smith - A Progressive Palliative Care Standardized Patient. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2016 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/42

Barney Smith 3 - A Transitions of Care Interprofessional Education Standardized Patient

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Abstract: 

This transitions of care Interprofessional education standardized patient serves to train Year 3 medical students and graduate students from physical, occupational and speech therapy in the transition of care of a frail older adult from the hospital to home. It is the third of a six part progressive standarized patient encounter on palliative care. This clinical simulation is an encounter with Barney as a hospitalized patient with newly acquired functional decline. Learners gain experience in the interprofessional team assessment of a hopsitalized older adult's functional status and the team management of that patient's transition of care from the hospital to home. Educational modalities include web-based instruction , the simulation, and a small group discussion of the interprofessional set of learners immediately following the encounter facilitated by interprofessional faculty.  

Educational objectives: 

1) Perform an interprofessional, comprehensive team assessment of a hospitalized older adult's functional assessment and the team mangement of that patient's transition of care from the hospital to home. 

2) Understand the role that individual discpliness play in conducting  a comprehesive assessment of an older adult's functinal status 

3) Assess specific risks and barriers to older adult safety as they transition from the hospital to home 

4) Assist family caregivers in identfying caregiver responsibilities and potential caregiver burden 

Date posted: 
Mon, 10/17/2016
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 10/17/2016
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Barney Smith 3 - A Transitions of Care Interprofessional Education Standardized Patient. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2016 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/42

VirginiaGeriatrics.Org

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

The VirginiaGeriatrics.Org website consists of 6 primary resources and a secondary list of resources for further research. These primary resources include a video archive of the geriatric grand round lecture series, interactive pre-clinical basic science geriatric case studies for medical students, more advanced geriatric case studies for clinical residents, a quick consult guide for geriatric consults, an "ask the expert" discussion resource, and various educational materials related to the Virginia Geriatrics Society Conference. Additionally, spread through the website are external educational resources to complement the core material. Finally, there are some resources for patients and families that may be interested in contacting clinics and/or geriatricians.

Educational objectives: 

Listed through 6 primary education sections (Grand Rounds, Med Student Materials, Resident Materials, Quick Consults, Ask the Expert, etc)

Date posted: 
Thu, 09/22/2016
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 09/22/2016
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
VirginiaGeriatrics.Org. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2016 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/42

Building Caregiver Partnerships Through Interprofessional Education

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Family caregivers are on the frontlines managing complicated chronic illnesses, assisting with day-to-day functioning, and providing direct care to manage symptoms and improve the quality of life of their loved ones. Yet, health professions students, medical/surgical residents, and care providers receive little, if any, training on the vital role that caregivers play on the healthcare team and how, effective partnering optimizes patient care throughout the illness trajectory and at end-of life.

The goal of Building Caregiver Partnerships through Innovative Interprofessional Education is to create effective partnerships between healthcare providers and family caregivers to reduce the burdens, ease suffering, and enhance the meaning of the caregiving experience for the patient, family and health care providers.  The project centers on a 20-minute film, No Roadmap: Caregiver Journeys, which features the compelling stories of four caregiving families. The film and companion discussion guides as well as resources for case-based learning and structured clinical encounters are freely accessible on the website. http://www.neomed.edu/medicine/palliativecare/building-caregiver-partnerships/

The website is designed so that faculty can easily select the materials that best fit their learners’ needs and the time constraints within their programs. The curricula is appropriate for medical, pharmacy, nursing, and other health professions educational programs at both undergraduate and graduate levels. Additionally, tools have been developed for interdisciplinary team-based forums and health provider training.  For medical/surgical residency programs, relevant ACGME milestones are identified. 

Educational objectives: 

The objectives of the educational tools are to prepare learners to:
• Describe home-based eldercare as a shared experience and the importance of building a relationship with family caregivers and care recipients based on trust, compassion and open communication; 
• Describe the vital role of family caregivers as important, but under recognized, members of the health care team;
• Discuss the meaning and challenges of family caregiving;
• Engage caregivers in meaningful discussions to identify the needs, values and goals of their caregiving family;
• Identify resources to address caregiver concerns and provide ongoing support; and
• Provide holistic team-based care to family caregivers that improves the quality of life for the care recipient and the caregivers. 

 

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

~~Date/Location Meeting/Forum Presentation Title Presenter(s)
Jan 28-31, 2016, Phoenix, Arizona; Society of Teachers of Family Medicine; 45 min presentation;  Exploring Caregiver Journeys: A Curricular Tool for Family Medicine Clerks;  D. Sperling; J.T. Thomas

March 10-13, 2016; Chicago, Ill;  American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine;  60-min workshop; Using Film to Foster Empathetic Partnerships between Care Providers and Family Caregivers;  J. Drost; E. Scott; M. Scott; D. Damore; S. Radwany

May 19-21, 2016; Long Beach, Ca; American Geriatrics Society; Poster; Building Caregiver Partnerships Through Innovative Health Professions Education; E. Scott, S. Radwany, D. Drost, K. Baughman, B. Palmisano, M. Sanders

May 19-21, 2016; Long Beach, Ca; American Geriatrics Society; Educational Product Session; Building Caregiver Partnership Through Innovative Health Professions Education; J. Drost; B. Palmisano

May 25, 2016; NEOMED Department of Family and Community Medicine Resident Scholarship Day; 15 min presentation; Exploring Caregiver Journeys: A Curricular Tool for Family Medicine Residents; D. Sperling; J.T. Thomas
 

Date posted: 
Mon, 12/12/2016
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 05/19/2017
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Building Caregiver Partnerships Through Interprofessional Education. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2016 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/42

Error Disclosure: An Interprofessional Clinical Skills Session

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

The goal of this clinical skills session is for students to gain skills in working in teams during a particularly difficult situation: the team disclosure of medical errors.  There will be an encounter with a standardized patient (SP) acting as a family member, followed by feedback from the SP and for some students, a review of the recorded interview in a meeting with their mentors and mentor group.

Educational objectives: 

At completion of this case, the student will demonstrate effective team communication behaviors when:

  1. Discussing a medical error (by demonstrating four important principles),
  2. Planning for the disclosure (by demonstrating three important principles), and
  3. Conducting the disclosure (by demonstrating eight important principles).

The principles mentioned above are described in the online module.

Date posted: 
Mon, 10/12/2015
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 10/12/2015
Product Viewing Instructions: 
Video can be accessed via geriSAGE.com>Educational Modules "Interprofessional web-GEM on Values & Ethics". Handout can be accessed on geriSAGE.com>Resources link>"IP Error Disclosure Handout"
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Error Disclosure: An Interprofessional Clinical Skills Session. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2015 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/42

The Geriatric Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE)

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
3
Abstract: 

OSVEs (Objective Structured Video Examinations) may be used to teach principles of effective interdisciplinary team-based transitional care.  First introduced at the Medical College of Wisconsin in the mid-1990s, the OSVEs were used as brief “trigger videos” demonstrating ACGME competencies to which trainees would respond by completing multiple-choice or fill-in-the blank questions.  The Geriatric Transitions OSVE (GT-OSVE) replaces the individual, paper-based exercise with an experiential, team-based exercise focused on transitions of care.  The GT-OSVE also addresses interprofessional (IPE) competencies, including the importance of understanding the roles of other health care professionals.  A series of three GT-OSVE cases was developed with HRSA Geriatric Academic Career Award support (#K01HP20487) to meet an unmet need in care transitions education.  Most existing care transitions educational materials focus on the time of hospital discharge.  The three GT-OSVE cases focus instead on post-hospital transitional care in various settings, including the outpatient primary care clinic, skilled nursing facility and assisted living facility.  The GT-OSVE case presented here (“Hospital to Outpatient Care Transition”) is the first case in this series and addresses the first post-hospital primary care outpatient visit.  The GT-OSVE “Hospital to Outpatient Care Transition” case is a required component of the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) rotation for third-year family medicine residents at the University of Utah.  These residents work with clinical pharmacy residents and physician assistant students to complete the GT-OSVE exercise.  The GT-OSVE was designed to be applicable to health professions trainees ranging from novice (e.g. preclinical medical student) to advanced (e.g. senior medical resident), and to be equally relevant to both interdisciplinary teams and teams whose members are all of the same discipline.

Educational objectives: 

Upon completion of this material you will be able to: 

1. Understand best practices in post-hospital transitional care.
2. Acquire practical experience in formulating a high-quality, team-based transitions plan.
3. Discuss the contributions of other health professions trainees in formulating effective transitions.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Order of Resource Files


First, trainees should complete the pretest and self-efficacy survey.


Second, faculty facilitator(s) should consider emailing trainees the links to the online transitions and team functioning modules found in the optional advance preparation assignment document.  This content may be reviewed on each trainee’s own time prior to the didactic session.  The “Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training (GITT)” module is freely available; permission has been granted from the author of the “Transitions of Care:  Leaving the Hospital” module to use this module as an advance preparation assignment for the GT-OSVE.


Third, faculty should deliver the care transitions didactic presentation to trainees prior to the GT-OSVE exercise.  This didactic reinforces and expands upon the care transitions and team leadership content of the optional advance preparation assignment.


Fourth, on the day of the GT-OSVE exercise, faculty should ask each team member to discuss his or her role (e.g. resident, physician assistant, pharmacist, nurse, social worker).  A team leader (not necessarily the medical student or resident) should be identified.   Faculty should review the faculty and team leader instructions and discuss them with the team (see also “Facilitation Schema” below).  Trainees should then be provided with the hypothetical patient chart corresponding with Mr. John Coleman so that they have access to the same information as the resident physician depicted in the video.  Trainees should also be provided with the after-visit summary template that prompts them to consider Coleman’s “four pillars” of transitional care as well as barriers to transitional care.


Fifth, the video file, “Hospital to outpatient care transition,” should be shown.  The team leader should facilitate team discussion and should elicit the contributions of each team member.  After the team discussion, the team leader should present to faculty the transitions plan agreed upon by the team.  The faculty checklist of care transitions and team leadership domains should be used by faculty to help track the extent to which the team leader addresses key care transitions domains and identifies barriers to the transitions plan during his or her presentation of the transitions plan, and also the extent to which the team leader facilitates the transitions plan among the team. Finally, each trainee should complete the post-test and self-efficacy survey.


Practical implementation advice
The GT-OSVE case, “Hospital to Outpatient Care Transition,” was designed to ease the scheduling demands often inherent in interdisciplinary education.   Since this GT-OSVE case presents a videotaped encounter with a standardized patient, programs do not need to compensate or schedule standardized patients.  Required materials include a computer with Internet access, PowerPoint slides, and hard copies of ancillary materials including pretest and posttest surveys, faculty and team leader instructions, hypothetical patient chart materials, after-visit summary template and faculty checklist.  Optional materials include the advance preparation assignment and a projector and screen, although the video case can be displayed on a laptop with small groups.  Trainees will require 40 minutes to review the online modules prior to GT-OSVE administration.  Faculty should allow approximately 60 minutes on the day of the GT-OSVE exercise to include the following activities: explanation of the GT-OSVE exercise (10 minutes), viewing of the “Hospital to Outpatient Care Transition” video case (10 to 15 minutes), team formulation of the transitions plan (10 minutes), presentation of the transitions plan by the team leader to faculty (5 minutes), faculty debrief and team discussion (10 minutes) and completion of the posttest survey (5 minutes).  At least one faculty member must be present to set up the video and hard copy materials, introduce the case and debrief trainees at the end of the session.  Whenever possible, faculty from additional disciplines should participate to enrich the feedback provided to trainees during the debriefing component.  Estimated faculty preparation time includes reviewing the online modules (40 minutes), PowerPoint slides and GT-OSVE case (60 minutes), and hard copy materials (30 minutes).

Strategies to avoid potential pitfalls
We have noticed several potential pitfalls when administering the GT-OSVE “Hospital to Outpatient Care Transition” case.  First, depending on the personality of the trainees involved, one trainee sometimes dominates the team discussion.  In order to ensure that each trainee contributes to the transitions plan equitably, we created the after-visit summary template containing the “four pillars” of effective care transitions as well as a fifth component (barriers to an effective transition).  We ask each trainee to jot down notes on this after-visit summary template as they watch the GT-OSVE with the expectation that the team leader will elicit and integrate the contributions of each trainee.  This approach has reduced the tendency of one team member to dominate the discussion.  Second, we noticed that the 4 minute and 36 second pre-visit planning section section (from 0:00 to 4:36) and the 3 minute and 14 second post-visit planning section of the GT-OSVE “Hospital to Outpatient Care Transition” video (from 12:01-15:15), which depicts a resident physician modeling pre and post-visit planning with a medical assistant and a care manager, can prompt trainees with numerous items to include in the transitions plan.  As a result, we generally reserve the pre and post-visit planning sections of this GT-OSVE case for more novice teams of trainees, such as preclinical medical students, who are less likely than more advanced trainees to be familiar with the medical home setting.  This reduces the length of the video to 9 minutes and 10 seconds (4:37 – 12:00 and 15:16-17:03). Third, we noticed that stopping the video at 12:00 (just after the conversation with Mr. Coleman and his daughter-in-law) works well since, when trainees viewed the end of the clinical encounter (15:16 – 17:03) before discussing the case as a team, they provided feedback that the office visit was over and that parts of the transitions plan had already been presented in the video before they had an opportunity to formulate their own transitions plan.  We now play the last part of the clinical encounter (15:16-17:03) after the trainees present their transition plan.  This approach has worked well since the final segment demonstrates that even a carefully crafted transitions plan might not succeed if the patient is not fully engaged in the plan.  Finally, there may be instances in which more than one trainee from a single discipline is present (e.g. two physician assistant students).  When this occurs, we encourage the “duplicate” trainee to consider attending to aspects of the case they might not often address (e.g. nutritional, psychosocial, or functional issues).  We feel this approach helps increase trainees’ appreciation for the roles of other disciplines, even when trainees from other disciplines are not present, and also demonstrates that team members’ roles can often overlap.


Limitations of the resource and opportunities for improvement
The most important limitation of the GT-OSVE involves its videotaped format.  Although the videotaped standardized patient encounter ensures lack of variability in the case from session to session, we are unable to reproduce the spontaneity of live interactions between trainees and the standardized patient.  However, faculty can rewind the video to replay particularly noteworthy video clips and use this technique as a basis for discussion with their trainees.  The GT-OSVE could also serve as a training video to create a live OSCE session dedicated to care transitions.  We also recognize that the length of time (25 to 30 minutes) allotted for the team members to watch the video, formulate a transitions plan and present to a faculty preceptor may be longer than the time allotted during a real-world post-hospital primary care outpatient visit.  We mention in our faculty debrief to trainees that they may have less time to conduct real-world transitional care visits, and we emphasize that best practices in care transitions taught by the GT-OSVE case can be an organizing principle to help them structure what can otherwise be chaotic office visits following hospital discharge.  We also discuss in our faculty debrief to trainees the importance of other team members’ roles and working as a team to best meet the complex needs of vulnerable older adult patients in a timely fashion.

Permissions for Advance Preparation Assignment Materials

The GITT (Geriatrics Interdisciplinary Team Training) modules are freely available online from the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing.

The online module entitled "Transitions of Care:  Leaving the Hospital" is used with permission from Kathyrn Eubank, MD.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Publications
Farrell T, Brunker C (2015). GT-OSVE: A Method to Teach Effective Interdisciplinary Team-Based Post-Hospital Transitional Care [Web]. MedEdPORTAL Publications.  Available from: https://www.mededportal.org/publication/10129 http://dx.doi.org/10.15766/mep_2374-8265.10129 - See more at: https://www.mededportal.org/publication/10129#sthash.R35yConZ.dpuf.


Farrell TW, Brunker C, Wong B, Luptak M, Supiano KP (2015). Health professions trainees' satisfaction with the Geriatric Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE) and self-efficacy in care transitions domains [Abstract]. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 63(S1), S56.


Farrell TW, Brunker CB (2014). Tools you can use: geriatric structured video examination [Web]. John A. Hartford Foundation. Available from: http://www.jhartfound.org/blog/tools-you-can-use-geriatric-transitions-objective-structured-video-examination/


Presentations
Farrell TW. Health professions trainees' satisfaction with the Geriatric Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE) and self-efficacy in care transitions domains. American Geriatrics Society 2015 Annual Scientific Meeting, National Harbor, MD.


Farrell TW, Brunker CP, Supiano KP (2015). The Geriatric Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE): an interdisciplinary approach to teaching and assessing best practices in transitional care. University of Utah Division of Geriatics: Research in Progress series.


Farrell TW and Brunker CB (2014). The Geriatric Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE): an interdisciplinary approach to teaching and assessing best practices in transitional care. Society for Social Work Leadership in Health Care (SSWLHC) 49th Annual Conference, Salt Lake City, UT.


Farrell TW (2014). Geriatric Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE). Department of Veterans Affairs National GEC Leads Virtual Conference.


Farrell TW and Brunker CB (2014). Geriatrics Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE). HRSA Geriatric Academic Career Award: Quarterly Technical Assistance Call.


Farrell TW (2014).  Geriatrics Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE).  John A. Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence annual site visit.


Luther B, Farrell TW, Wilson R (2014). Innovative methods of developing interprofessional education. University of Utah College of Nursing Care Management Workshop: Developing Skills of Change. Salt Lake City, UT.


Farrell TW. Objective structured video examinations (OSVEs) focused on transitions of care. Presented at Education Product Showcase, American Geriatrics Society 2013 Annual Scientific Meeting. Grapevine, TX.


Farrell TW, Brunker CB (2013). Geriatric transitions objective structured video examination (OSVE). Marketplace II session, Donald W. Reynolds Foundation 11th Annual Grantee Meeting. Coronado, CA.


Farrell TW, Brunker CB (2012). Geriatric transitions objective structured video examination (OSVE). Presented at Marketplace I session, Donald W. Reynolds Foundation 10th Annual Meeting. St. Louis, MO.


Farrell TW (2012). Geriatric Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (OSVE).  John A. Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence annual site visit. Salt Lake City, UT.


Farrell TW (2012).  Geriatrics Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE).  John A. Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence annual site visit.  Salt Lake City, UT.


Farrell TW and Nagoshi M (2012).  Interprofessional education products developed by the University of Utah and the University of Hawaii. 'Geri-West' consortium conference call.


Citations
US Department of Health and Human Services.  Multiple chronic conditions resource summary:  Geriatric Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE).  Available at:  http://www.hhs.gov/ash/initiatives/mcc/educational...

 

 

 

 

Date posted: 
Thu, 10/06/2016
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 10/06/2016
Product Viewing Instructions: 
Each user is asked to indicate his or her name, degree, academic title, name of institution or organization, contact information, purpose for using OSVE videos, and disciplines of those using the videos.
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
The Geriatric Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE). POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2016 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/42

A Geriatric Interview with the Gynecologist

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
0
Abstract: 

Assessing and treating gynecologic conditions is important in all decades of a woman's life.  Each decade of life presents a unique set of issues for women.  During the senior period of a woman's life, the conditions to assess can be nongynecologic in nature including osteoporosis, fall risk, memory and activities of daily living.  This video will help serve as a guide when screening the older adult female population for any issues related to aging.  If issues do exist, referral to a geriatric specialist may be appropriate for further evaluation.

Educational objectives: 

After reviewing the video, the learner should be able to:

1) to conduct a thorough gynecologic and nongynecologic history in the older adult female population such as osteoporosis, fall risk, memory and activities of daily living. 

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Quicktime is needed to view this video.

Gynecologists:  Mary Jane Pearson, MD; Irwin Kerber, MD

Geriatrician:  Belinda Vicioso, MD

 

Date posted: 
Tue, 12/02/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 12/02/2014
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
A Geriatric Interview with the Gynecologist. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/42

Geriatric Nephrology OSCE

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

At the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW), geriatricians, nephrologists and medical educators worked together to create and implement a geriatric nephrology OSCE for nephrology fellows. Key curriculum content gaps (pathophysiology of the aging kidney, medication and renal dosing and renal toxicity in elderly patients) were identified through a needs assessment including:

  1. ACGME nephrology requirements
  2. Nephrology fellows' in-service exam scores
  3. Survey of fellows and faculty to identify areas of perceived weakness
  4. Literature review, and
  5. Brief MCQ of basic science linked to clinical case questions.

Curriculum content was delivered using the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) educational / assessment method. The curriculum session highlighted kidney injury and pharmacology topics: drug toxicity + underlying science through an OSCE session with post session debriefing provided by faculty. Fellows were evaluated by faculty and standardized patients using a checklist, and fellows evaluated the session at its completion. This submission contains all materials for the geriatric nephrology OSCE session.

Educational objectives: 

1. Demonstrate competence in the prevention, evaluation and management of geriatric aspects of nephrology, including disorders of the aging kidney and urinary tract.

2. Apply knowledge of physiology and pathology of the aging kidney + drug dosing and renal toxicity in the elderly patient.

3. When called as a consultant, to quickly: a. Identify signs of adverse drug reactions (drug overdose/toxicity) in an elderly patient and, b. Communicate a management plan to the patient and family.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Additional details may be found in the detailed Instructors' Guide included in the submission.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Denson K, Manzi G, Foy P, Vasudev B, Malmsten C, Rehm J, Brown D, Simpson D, Duthie E, Using Teaching Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCEs) to Expand Fellows' Perceptions Around Quality Care for Older Adults, American Geriatrics Society Annual Meeting, Orlando, FL 04/2014.

Date posted: 
Fri, 09/25/2015
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 09/25/2015
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Geriatric Nephrology OSCE. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2015 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/42

Chief Resident Workshop in Bad News Communication & Learner Feedback

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

Incoming chief residents from all departments participate in a 90 minutes workshop with the dual objectives of teaching a model for sharing bad news and preparing these physician leaders to give feedback to learners about this important skill.  After reviewing a 6 step model for bad news communication, the chief residents share bad news with standardized patients using two cases of older adults with a new or recurrent cancer diagnosis.  The standardized patients all receive training about the workshop's objectives in a separate session prior to the workshop.  After communicating with the standardized patient, the chief resident receives feedback from the patient, a trained faculty small group facilitator and 1-2 other chief residents.  After both cases are completed, the chief residents gather for a large group discussion about the challenges and opportunities in providing feedback to learners about sensitive topics.  This workshop has been conducted for the past three years, and has received positive evaluations from the participating physicians and the school's Graduate Medical Education Office.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Recognize bad news communication as a core physician skill
  2. Understand the 6 basic steps used to initially deliver bad news
  3. Practice giving feedback to a resident whom delivered bad news
  4. Identify & discuss challenges of providing feedback about a sensitive topic
Date posted: 
Thu, 10/02/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 10/02/2014
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Chief Resident Workshop in Bad News Communication & Learner Feedback. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/42

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