The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Educational Report

Detailed account or statement, often outlining the results or events of an endeavor, activity or study (e.g. review, position statement, newsletter, whitepaper, evaluation) related to education.

(Y5SAA) ELDER Project: Cultural Diversity: African American Culture

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

ELDER Project, Year 5 of 6: This is session 7 of 13 focused on culture, and is designed to teach licensed and unlicensed health care professionals about the African American Culture. Content includes the role of religion, traditional health care beliefs, social values, and family structure and their impact on health.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Discuss the role of religion, traditional health care beliefs, social values, and family structure of African Americans and the impact these factors have on health care.
  2. Identify specific culturally sensitive practices that can be incorporated into your work with African American patients.
  3. Examine historical influences that shape the attitudes of some African Americans in relation to current day healthcare.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

 

  1. The Ethno geriatric Curriculum from the RIGEC (Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center) website. · http://www.uri.edu/outreach/rigec/minority_health.html
  1. Online course designed to foster cultural competence among nurses supported by the Office of Minority Health; ·American Institutes for Research. (2002). Teaching cultural competence in health care: A review of current concepts, policies and practices. Report prepared for the Office of Minority Health. Washington, DC: Author.
  1. A Georgetown-based series on cultural awareness, self-assessment and personal identity, and communication in a multicultural environment - Gilbert, J., Goode, T. D., & Dunne, C. (2007). Cultural awareness. From the Curricula Enhancement Module Series. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development.
  1. On-line learning experience on health literacy, Unified Health Communication 101: Addressing Health Literacy, Cultural Competency, and Limited English Proficiency, supported by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) - Links to the Tool: This tool is available at: http://www.hrsa.gov/publichealth/healthliteracy/
  1. Bernal, H.,  & Froman, R. (1993) Influences on the cultural self-efficacy of community health nurses. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 4 (2), 24-31.
  1. Camphina-Bacote, J. (2008). The process of cultural competence in the delivery of healthcare services. Retrieved December 1, 2008 from: http://www.transculturalcare.net/Publications.htm
  1. Office of Minority Health. (2007). National standards on Culturally and linguistically appropriate services (CLAS). Retrieved December 15, 2008 from http://www.omhrc.gov/templates/browse.aspx?lvl=2&lvlID=15
  1. A comprehensive curriculum in the health care of elders from diverse ethnic populations for training in all health care disciplines. It was developed by representatives from over 30 Geriatric Education Centers and includes five Core Curriculum modules and eleven Ethnic Specific Modules to be used in conjunction with the Core Curriculum. Available at http://www.stanford.edu/group/ethnoger/index.html.
  1. National Center for Cultural Competence Curricula Enhancement Module Series.  Cultural Awareness.  Retrieved on June 28th, 2010 from http://www.nccccurricula.info/awareness/index.html.

 

Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 04/30/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y5SAA) ELDER Project: Cultural Diversity: African American Culture. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/290

Health Literacy and Patient Safety: Help Patients Understand

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
3
Abstract: 

This manual reviews the problem of health literacy, its consequences for the health care system, and the likelihood that a clinician’s practice includes patients with limited literacy. The manual then provides practical tips for clinicians to use in making their office practices more “user friendly” to patients with limited literacy, and gives suggestions for improving interpersonal communication between clinicians and patients. Finally, the manual concludes with several “case discussions” based on vignettes in the accompanying instructional video.

Educational objectives: 

MANUAL FOR PHYSICIANS
The enclosed materials will enable physicians to:

  • Define the scope of the health literacy problem.
  • Recognize health system barriers faced by patients with low literacy.
  • Implement improved methods of verbal and written communication.
  • Incorporate practical strategies to create a shame-free environment.

REDUCING THE RISK
The activity will enable physicians to:

  • Define the scope of patient safety problems caused by low health literacy and the need to manage the risk they present
  • Recognize the ethical and legal foundations for safe medical practices and patient-centered care
  • Explain patient safety concepts and approaches utilized in designing safer practice environments
  • Identify patient safety practices that reduce the risk of miscommunication and optimize the patient’s ability to safely manage their own care
  • Determine steps toward establishing a climate for change
  • Identify tools and resources for creating safer practice environments
  • Demonstrate how to utilize and implement these tools in a practice environment
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Communication is essential for the effective delivery of health care, and is one of the most powerful tools in a clinician’s arsenal. Unfortunately, there is often a mismatch between a clinician’s level of communication and a patient’s level of comprehension. In fact, evidence shows that patients often misinterpret or do not understand much of the information given to them by clinicians. This lack of understanding can lead to medication errors, missed appointments, adverse medical outcomes, and even malpractice lawsuits. Clinicians can most readily improve what patients know about their health care by confirming that patients understand what they need to know and by adopting a more patient-friendly communication style that encourages questions.

Date posted: 
Tue, 09/21/2010
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 09/21/2010
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . Health Literacy and Patient Safety: Help Patients Understand. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2010 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/290

The Physician's Role in Medication Reconciliation: Issues, Strategies, and Safety Principles

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

In “The physician’s role in medication reconciliation,” the panel aims to heighten physician awareness of the integral role of reconciliation in the safe use of medications and to provide a framework for physicians to understand their personal roles and responsibilities in this often difficult process of care.

The essence of medication reconciliation is making sense of a patient’s medications and resolving conflicts between different sources of information to minimize harm and to maximize therapeutic effects. It is an ongoing, dynamic, episodic and team-based process that should be led by and is the responsibility of the patient’s attending or personal physician in collaboration with other health care professionals. Medication reconciliation is essential to optimize the safe and effective use of medications.

Educational objectives: 

After completing this activity, participants should be able to:

  • Describe medication reconciliation principles and processes
  • Distinguish the physician's role in the medication reconciliation process
  • Integrate patient-centric aspects of medication reconciliation into practice
  • Create a medication management plan with your patients
  • Integrate principles and processes into practice in all settings of care
  • Identify appropriate medication reconciliation team in all settings of care
  • Identify proper delegation of clinical and nonclinical medication reconciliation responsibilities
  • Lead your organization's efforts to support medication reconciliation
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This monograph first provides background on medication issues, including: medication errors and adverse drug events, communication problems and medication reconciliation’s relationship to patient safety. It then presents an overview, including the steps of medication reconciliation, the underlying principles of medication reconciliation for deeper understanding of the physician’s leadership role and obligations, and guidance for effective achievement of medication reconciliation. This is followed by strategies for two particularly important areas of medication reconciliation: taking a medication history and promoting patient understanding of their medication regimen. Case study examples illustrate medication reconciliation failures and can be the basis for discussions physicians may have with their medical team and with their patients.

Recognizing that ultimately all health care safety and factors affecting medication reconciliation must be customized to the particular patient and practicing setting, this monograph does not offer rigid prescriptions, but rather general principles that physicians and their teams may adapt to their specific circumstances and needs. Because medication reconciliation represents an integral part of the patient safety effort, this monograph offers guidelines and information on developing support for medication reconciliation in the context of core safety principles. It provides useful information for physicians’ use in local improvement efforts and in advocacy for medication safety.

Finally, this monograph discusses important special topics critical to effective medication reconciliation: information technology, coordination of care and vulnerable populations. Information technology has tremendous potential, but it also poses significant challenges. This discussion highlights some of those issues. It also reviews a key issue in medication reconciliation—coordination of care—and sketches a directly related effort to address this concern (i.e., medical homes). In addition to enhancing coordination of care, medical homes may provide important benefits to older and minority populations—groups that are disproportionately affected by ineffective medication reconciliation. Lastly and significantly, the monograph discusses vulnerable patient populations, including older adults and minorities, and provides examples and potential strategies to improve medication reconciliation for these patients.

For information on receiving CME credit, go to http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/no-index/physician-resources/medication-reconciliation.shtml.

Date posted: 
Tue, 09/07/2010
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 09/07/2010
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . The Physician's Role in Medication Reconciliation: Issues, Strategies, and Safety Principles. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2010 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/290

Effective Clinical Partnerships between Primary Care Medical Practices and Public Health Agencies

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

The purposes of the study reported in this monograph were:

  • To identify partnerships between public health and medicine that increase the effectiveness and efficiency of clinical care, with a particular emphasis on the aging population; and
  • Through a careful examination of current models, to identify themes and lessons that would be useful in the expansion, replication, and broader application of such partnerships.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

The monograph is divided into four sections. The introduction reviews the literature on primary care/public health partnerships. The methods used in our research are described in the second section. The third section describes the 48 programs we identified and profiled, thereby providing an inventory of the wide range of partnerships currently in operation. The fourth section presents the results of qualitative analyses of in-depth interviews we conducted with key participants in a selection of 16 programs. The final section presents our conclusions and recommendations.

Our research methods included conducting a national scan to identify successful ongoing programs, gathering detailed information from a sample of the identified programs, and analyzing the data to identify themes and lessons that could be drawn from the experiences of these pioneers.

We believe that the U.S. health care system would benefit greatly from more integration between population-oriented and individual patient care systems. This monograph is intended to foster movement in that direction.

Date posted: 
Tue, 09/07/2010
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 09/07/2010
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . Effective Clinical Partnerships between Primary Care Medical Practices and Public Health Agencies. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2010 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/290

Promoting Preventive Services for Adults 50-64: Community and Clinical Partnerships

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

Promoting Preventive Services for Adults 50-64: Community and Clinical Partnerships is a landmark document intended to help promote lifesaving clinical preventive services for adults aged 50 to 64. As the first in a series, this innovative resource identifies a set of recommended preventive services, provides indicators and data at national, state, and selected local levels with which to monitor progress, and promotes successful strategies to facilitate adoption and use. It is hoped that this information will spark vigorous and sustained collaborations that make effective screening, counseling, vaccinations, and other recommended services a routine part of prevention for the nation's adults. 

Educational objectives: 

Much national attention has been paid to the impact of longer life spans on the health of older adults in their 70s, 80s and beyond. Just one generation behind them is a group equally worthy of note. In 2007, Americans between the ages of 50 and 64 numbered nearly 55 million. By 2015, the aging of baby boomers will boost this group of adults to 63 million strong – nearly 20 percent of the population. This report delineates science-based strategies and highlights "calls to action" that build on linkages between clinical and community efforts to facilitate the delivery of multiple preventive services.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

For more information on this topic, please visit http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/DACH_PPS/Default/Default.aspx.

Date posted: 
Tue, 09/07/2010
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 09/07/2010
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . Promoting Preventive Services for Adults 50-64: Community and Clinical Partnerships. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2010 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/290

Geropsychiatric Nursing Competency Enhancements

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

Nurses care for older adults in health and illness across the full range of health care settings. Especially in late life, physical illness often precipitates and/or is accompanied by psychiatric symptoms. Therefore it is important that nursing education programs provide knowledge and skills that prepare nurses to care for older adults with mental health concerns and psychiatric/substance misuse disorders.

The Geropsychiatric Nursing Collaborative has developed the following resources to draw attention to the special needs of older adults.

  • Definition of Geropsychiatric Nursing. This definition serves to guide future discussions about preparing nurses to care for older adults with mental health concerns.
  • Key Concepts. These key concepts are foundational to the geropsychiatric nursing competency enhancements.
  • Geropsychiatric Nursing Competency Enhancements. These enhancements are not intended to ‘stand-alone,’ but rather to enhance existing or to-be-developed competencies by relevant professional nursing organizations. The competency enhancements are organized in four topic areas: entry level and advanced practice level for Gerontological, Psychiatric-Mental Health and Other Specialties Caring for Older Adults, i.e.  Adult, Family, Acute Care, and Women’s Health. The advanced level category is further categorized by role, either Nurse Practitioner or Clinical Nurse Specialist.
Educational objectives: 

Based on the competency enhancements, the Geropsychiatric Nursing Collaborative is identifying and evaluating the quality and suitability (appropriateness, evidence base, relevance, cultural sensitivity, and currency) of extant curricular and training materials for each level of curricula and identifying gaps at both the entry level, i.e., Associate and Bachelor of Science in Nursing, and the advanced level, i.e.,Master of Science in Nursing in Gerontological, Psychiatric-Mental Health and Adult/Family/Acute Care Women’s Health  Clinical Nurse Specialist and Nurse Practitioner Programs and the Doctor of Nursing Practice. The project will foster linkages of nursing education programs whose graduates will care for older adults to basic, graduate, post-graduate and continuing education geropsychiatric curricular offerings (courses, textbooks, journal articles, toolkits, training films, web-based courses and materials, course syllabi, and learning tools). All levels of nurses practicing in many different settings will require ‘retooling’ with current knowledge and skills in order to best provide mental health services to older adults.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

The competency enhancements are meant to inform the development of new and the updating of existing nursing competencies for the level and specialty indicated.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Buckwalter, K., Beck, C, Evans, L. (In press). Envisioning the Future of Geropsychiatric Nursing. In K.D. Melillo & S. C. Houde (Eds.). Geropsychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 2nd Ed. Boston: Jones & Bartlett Publishers.

Date posted: 
Wed, 04/04/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 04/04/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . Geropsychiatric Nursing Competency Enhancements. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/290

Experience In Implementing New Expanded Curriculum In Geriatrics For A Family Medicine Residency Program

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 
Developing efficient viable geriatric curriculum model for Family Medicine programs is a very hot nationwide topic nowadays, and our work effectively addresses it. For the last 3.5 years, we have successfully conducted new curriculum, increasing teaching time by 25% in the one-month 3rd year block rotation. Residents strongly agreed on relevance and importance of learning quality geriatric care for their future practices and their improved confidence and skills, and unanimously supported idea to increase the curriculum time. Our other goal is to expand a cross-cultural geriatrics component, as our residents care for a significant number of Pacific minorities population.
Educational objectives: 
Learners should be able to identify the most efficient ways of conducting geriatric medicine rotations for family medicine residency programs.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 
19 third-year family medicine residents in in-/outpatient, SNF/Rehab Center, and home visits settings; didactics seminars; interdisciplinary team meetings; home visits; elements of in-patient geriatric consult services and out-patient geriatric family counseling. The strongest points were considered: one-on-one tutoring/rotation learning-to-service ratio; detailed discussions of patients seen; topics (geriatric assessment, dementia, MMSE, polypharmacy; delirium, home care). The most frequent suggestions for improvement were: more home visits; increased number of complex patients; increased topics in behavioral health, end-of-life and ethics. Absence of yet fully functional geriatric clinic was perceived as the weakest point of the program.
Date posted: 
Mon, 11/06/2006
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sat, 05/08/2010
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . Experience In Implementing New Expanded Curriculum In Geriatrics For A Family Medicine Residency Program. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2006 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/290

Mental Health Aspects of Diabetes in Elders from Diverse Ethnic Backgrounds

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

This curriculum was developed as a resource for teaching culturally appropriate care for depression and cognitive loss for elders at high risk for diabetes. Written by members of the Affiliated Core Faculty of Stanford Geriatric Education Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, the 100-page curriculum includes objectives and comprehensive, evidence-based content on the following topics: -- Overview of depression and cognitive loss/dementia in elders with diabetes -- Risk, culturally appropriate assessment and interventions for diabetes, depression, and cognitive loss or dementia in the following older populations: -- African American -- American Indian -- Chinese American -- Filipino American -- Hmong American -- Japanese American -- Mexican American -- Cross cultural issues related to sensory impairment due to diabetes in emergencies such as bioterrorism

Educational objectives: 

After completion of the curriculum, learners should be able to: 1. Identify the risks of depression and cognitive loss among elders with diabetes; 2. List the ethnic populations of elders among whom the risk of diabetes is higher than among older Americans as a whole; 3. Describe culturally appropriate assessment and screening protocols for cognitive loss and depression among elders with diabetes from at least three high risk populations; 4. Discuss specific nutritional interventions appropriate for elders with diabetes from at least three high risk populations; 5. Identify differences in treatment for diabetes, depression, or cognitive loss that might be appropriate for elders from high risk populations. 6. Discuss at least three risk factors for vulnerability in developing a personalized emergency preparedness plan for sensory impaired ethnic elders with diabetes

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This product has been sent to Geriatric Education Centers, the Lumetra conference, universities, seminars, trainings, and various other learning institutions. It has been used in health-related classes, medical facilities, learning institutions, and educational trainers.

Date posted: 
Mon, 01/26/2009
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sun, 10/18/2009
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Mental Health Aspects of Diabetes in Elders from Diverse Ethnic Backgrounds. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2009 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/290

Demographics of Aging Webct Module for Medical Students

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

This geriatric module, Demographics of Aging, provides required introductory material for 1st year medical students in their community-based clinical experience (Practical Immersion Experience - PIE).

Educational objectives: 

The goal of this module is to provide basic geriatric medicine information for medical students in the community. Upon completion of this module, learners should be able:

  1. To understand the aging demographic trends nationally and in New Mexico, particularly their relevance to care for the elderly, including economic impact and impact on the health care system.
  2. To understand the effect of the "baby boomer" generation on future health care needs.
  3. To be able to find United States and New Mexico aging population statistics on the internet in order to understand the relationship of population cohorts to health issues and planning for future health care services.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Best implemented as PIE (Practical Immersion Experience), and/or an Ambulatory Clerkship in a community-based setting.

Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2006
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 05/20/2010
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . Demographics of Aging Webct Module for Medical Students. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2006 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/290

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