The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Educational Report

Detailed account or statement, often outlining the results or events of an endeavor, activity or study (e.g. review, position statement, newsletter, whitepaper, evaluation) related to education.

Aging and Immunity: The Important Role of Vaccines

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Sponsors: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
0
Abstract: 

Immune function wanes in all adults—whether healthy or sick—as they age into their fifth decade and beyond. Their bodies become less adept at recognizing and stopping pathogens, and the ability to develop and maintain immunity declines. Also known as  immunosenescence, age-related decline in immunity significantly contributes to the susceptibility of older adults to serious conditions, including influenza, pneumonia, and shingles.

Patients often believe that by living a healthy lifestyle, they can avoid illness and disease. While exercising, getting recommended screenings, and eating right are important for staying healthy, they alone do not prevent older adults from acquiring vaccine-preventable diseases. For older adults who feel, and generally are, healthy, it can be difficult to recognize that immunosenescence is occurring or what impact it may have. Underappreciation for immunosenescence could at least partially explain why adult vaccines remain significantly underutilized, despite their ability to stimulate and heighten immune response and boost waning immunity in older adults. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, in 2015, only 57% of Americans aged 65 years or older received a tetanus vaccine in the prior 10 years, 64% had received a pneumococcal vaccine, and only 34% had ever received a herpes zoster vaccine. Among adults 50 years and
older, four vaccine-preventable diseases alone—influenza, herpes zoster, pneumococcal disease, and pertussis—cost the United States more than $26 billion annually.

Ensuring that adult patients receive recommended vaccines is an important way to prevent unnecessary infections and reduce health care costs. Health care professionals play a key role in this process, specifically, they should:

  • Assess their adult patient’s immunization status
  • Strongly recommend vaccination at every opportunity using the 4R approach: Recommend, Repeat, Remind, Review
  • Have a program that supports in-practice vaccine administration
  • Refer patients to a health care professional who administers vaccines if you do not
  • Document vaccine administration and submit to the immunization registry

Vaccination is a critical component of protecting the health of individuals as they age. Providing a strong recommendation for vaccination at each encounter increases the likelihood of an individual accepting a vaccine, reducing the risk for debilitating illness, and protecting quality of life.

Educational objectives: 
  • Provide healthcare professionals with an understanding of the biological impact of aging on immunity,
  • Provide information to support the value of vaccination by exploring herpes zoster in depth and the role that age-related decline in immunity plays in this vaccine-preventable illness,
  • Offer practical tips and strategies for supporting aging patients’ health and overcoming barriers that may contribute to low rates of adult vaccination.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 
Date posted: 
Mon, 08/06/2018
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 07/19/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Aging and Immunity: The Important Role of Vaccines. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2018 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/290

Postoperative Delirium Curriculum For General Surgery Residents

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

According to estimates, 50% of older adults will have an operation after the age of 65 with postoperative delirium being the most common complication in this age group. Even though delirium is common, the diagnosis is often overlooked and improperly treated. The American Geriatric Society surveyed surgical specialists and found that delirium was the geriatric clinical issue having the largest knowledge gap. Most surgical training programs still have little geriatric care incorporated explicitly into the curricula, and little explicit assessment of skills in caring for older patients. There is still a significant gap in formalized delirium education in surgical training programs. Our goal is to address this gap with this postoperative delirium curriculum for general surgery residents. Our objective is that through this geriatric surgical curriculum with a foundation consisting of delirium prevention, assessment, and management will ultimately lead to improved surgical care outcomes for older adults. This is a case based guide to compliment an online module through the Surgical Council of Resident Education (SCORE) website. We designed an online module on the SCORE website on postoperative delirium and this is an interactive case based small group exercise along with pre-post test, mini-cex, pocket card, and consultant check sheet. The case will require learners to go through a real surgical case, identify and modify risk factors, do delirium risk assessment, use a validated delirium screening tool (4AT), and come up with prevention and treatment options.

Educational objectives: 

After completion of the curriculum, the surgical resident will be able to:

  1. Identify the pathophysiological causes of postoperative delirium.
  2. Identify risk factors for the development of postoperative delirium.
  3. Recognize interventions to prevent postoperative delirium.
  4. Describe the common presentation of delirium and be able to distinguish delirium from dementia and depression.
  5. Recognize evidence based assessment tools (e.g. 3D CAM, 4AT, etc.) as reliable ways to screen for postoperative delirium.
  6. Describe the major effects that delirium has on surgical and patient outcomes.
  7. Correctly employed a validated delirium assessment tool (e.g. 4AT) to screen postoperative delirium in non-ICU older confused surgical patient.
  8. Calculate the correct delirium risk assessment score for a case scenario.
  9. Propose strategies for mitigating preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative risk factors for a common general surgery case scenario.
  10. Identify "best-practice" non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment strategies to manage postoperative delirium given a case scenario   
  11. Demonstrate to their attending or geriatric consultant the correct use of a validated delirium assessment tool to screen for postoperative delirium in non-ICU older confused surgical patient. 
  12. Perform prevention measures and monitor delirium development via evidence based assessment method (e.g 4AT) prior to geriatric consult.   

As a result of the curriculum, surgical residents will rate as important that surgeons should know:

1. Treatment strategies for postoperative delirium.

2. How to screen for postoperative delirium using a validated assessment tool.       

3. Strategies to prevent postoperative delirium.      

 

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

This was presented at the American Geriatricy Society Meeting and American Delirium Society Meeting.

Date posted: 
Wed, 02/13/2019
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 01/28/2019
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Postoperative Delirium Curriculum For General Surgery Residents. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2019 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/290

Curriculum development for Geriatric Medicine Fellows PACE ( Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly) rotation.

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

This curriculum design serves as a tool to guide educators, involved in PACE (Program of All-Inclusive Care for Elderly) or similar models of care, to develop a structured learning environment. The learners (fellows, residents or medical students) will benefit from reviewing the curriculum and gaining a better understanding of expectations at PACE and similar models of care.

Educational objectives: 

Upon completion, the educator will be able to: 

1) Develop and implement a structured educational plan to help the geriatric learners gain knowledge, skills and attitude  to provide compassionate, integrated care to community dwelling frail older adults while working with an interdisciplinary team in the PACE setting. 

2) Develop an active learning environment for geriatric learners in the PACE setting to help them achieve a significant learning experience. 

3) Utilize this curriculum design as a springboard for educational strategies in settings outside PACE to integrate various learning strategies with assessment methods in order to achieve the desired goals and objectives. 

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

PACE (Program of All-Inclusive Care for Elderly) provides a very unique learning environment for Geriatric Medicine Fellows and other learners with an interest in Geriatrics. Learners are exposed to a population of frail, nursing home eligible older adults that continue to dwell in the community with the support of an integrated medico-social model of care. Learners can gain valuable insight on the functioning of a highly effective interdisciplinary team and learn about PACE and similar models of care.

Geriatric Medicine fellows at Virginia Commonwealth University currently spend one month at the PACE site in Richmond, Virginia. A new PACE curriculum was designed with the overarching goal of creating a significant learning experience. The first step was a general Needs Assessment with analysis of the difference between the current approach and an ideal approach. This was followed by a targeted Needs Assessment of the current and past learners as well as their learning environment.  Goals and objectives were then developed, and feedback and assessment methods were determined for each objective. The learning strategies were then assigned to each objective to develop an integrated course design.

Date posted: 
Thu, 09/05/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 09/05/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . Curriculum development for Geriatric Medicine Fellows PACE ( Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly) rotation. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/290

Patient and Family Centered Rounds: A description of interprofessional bedside rounds

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

Patient- and family-centered rounds (PFCR) is a model for empowering patients and families and improving communication and care in an academic, inpatient setting. This product contains multiple handouts and a PowerPoint that reviews core concepts of PFCR and includes steps to begin bedside interprofessional rounds in an academic inpatient setting. It could also be easily adapted to outpatient and nursing home situations.

Educational objectives: 

On completion, the learner will be able to:

1.  Describe the key elements of patient- and family-centered care (PFCC) and patient- and family-centered rounding (PFCR)
2.  List examples of how patient- and family-centered rounding can improve patient safety, staff satisfaction, and resident physician education
3.  Explain how patient- and family-centered rounds differ from traditional models of hospital care on an academic hospital unit 
4.  Describe specific examples of barriers and solutions to adopting patient- and family-centered rounding
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Since implementation by the family medicine residency of The Christ Hospital/University of Cincinnati in 2007, PFCR has been well received by geriatric patients and their families, with positive feedback regarding the value of the multiple opinions received under PFCR, the ease of obtaining answers to questions, and the positive engagement of the patient and family in care. Residents and interprofessional staff have also benefited form this care model of bedside interprofessional teaching.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Schlaudecker J, Stecher A, Meganathan K, Pallerla H. Peer-reviewed poster. Patient- and Family-Centered Rounds on a Geriatric Inpatient Service: Resident, Staff, and Patient Perspectives. The Fifth International Conference on Patient- and Family-Centered Care. Washington, DC. June 4-6, 2012. 

Schlaudecker J, Stecher A, Meganathan K, Pallerla H. Peer-reviewed poster. Patient- and Family-Centered Rounds on a Geriatric Inpatient Service: Resident, Staff, and Patient Perspectives. American Geriatrics Society Annual Scientific Meeting. Seattle, WA. May 3-5, 2012.

Schlaudecker J. Invited Lecture. Patient- and Family-Centered Care: The Next Frontier in Geriatrics. Attendance 250. Ohio Health Care Association Annual Convention of Long-Term Care Facilities. Columbus, OH. May 1, 2012. 

Percelay J, Stein J, Schlaudecker J, Toth H. Peer-reviewed workshop. Patient- and Family-Centered Rounds: Improving Satisfaction, Safety, and Efficiency. Society of Hospital Medicine Annual Meeting. San Diego, CA. April 2-4, 2012.

Schlaudecker J, Stecher A, Meganathan K, Pallerla H. Peer-reviewed poster. Patient- and Family-Centered Rounds on a Geriatric Inpatient Service: Resident, Staff, and Patient Perspectives. Society of Hospital Medicine Annual Meeting. San Diego, CA. April 2-4, 2012. 

Schlaudecker J. Invited Faculty: “Hospitals and Communities Moving Forward with Patient- and Family-Centered Care: An intensive Training Seminar of Partnerships for Quality and Safety.” Institute for Patient-and Family-Centered Care. Seminars led: “Involving Physicians in Patient- and Family-Centered Initiatives: Applying Principles to Practice” 120 attendees; “Collaborative Rounds in Adult Cardiology” 75 attendees; “Patient- and Family-Centered Rounds: What’s In It for Patients, Families, and Professionals” 120 attendees. Madison, WI, November 7-10, 2011. Atlanta, GA, March 18-22, 2012. 

Schlaudecker J.  Keynote Speaker: Patient- and Family-Centered Care on the Adult Hospital Unit and in the ICU. Ohio Regional Conference on Family-Centered Care. The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio. February 29, 2012.

 

Schlaudecker J, Bernheisel CB.  Interprofessional Bedside Family-Centered Rounds on an academic family medicine resident service.  Lecture/Workshop. Society of Teachers of Family Medicine Annual Spring Conference.New Orleans, LO. April 28, 2011.

Date posted: 
Thu, 07/10/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 07/10/2014
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Patient and Family Centered Rounds: A description of interprofessional bedside rounds. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/290

From Publication to Practice: An interdisciplinary look at labeling changes for acetaminophen and the implications for patient care

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This special publication aims to inform health care providers, researchers, policy makers, caregivers, and patients about recent changes to acetaminophen labeling as required by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. While acetaminophen is the most widely used analgesic in America, it is also the leading cause of acute liver failure, usually as a result of inadvertent overdose. Several significant changes to the packaging and labeling of over-the-counter and prescription products containing acetaminophen have occurred recently, and other major developments are anticipated shortly. In order to accomplish the goal of improving patient safety, these changes must be understood by clinicians and patients alike. This issue of From Publication to Practice provides you with essential information on the new labeling changes and describes the resulting implications for patient care, especially for older patients. It also presents important steps that clinicians can take when educating patients. We believe that this latest report in our From Publication to Practice series will assist you in developing and enhancing your pain management services.

Educational objectives: 

After reading this publication, the provider will be able to:

  1. Describe labeling changes for acetaminophen and the safety concerns that led to the changes.
  2. Discuss specific issues surrounding the labeling changes that impact patient care for older adults.
  3. Recommend dosage adjustments for older patients taking acetaminophen.
  4. Effectively communicate with older adults about the critical need to follow new acetaminophen dosage recommendations and directions for use.
  5. Discuss pain management guidelines for older patients in pain, including alternative medications and therapies.
  6. Identify resources and new initiatives supporting safe use of acetaminophen.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

These materials were reviewed by a faculty panel.

For more educational products from the GSA, visit https://www.geron.org/Resources/Online%20Store/gsa-products

Date posted: 
Mon, 07/09/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 07/09/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
From Publication to Practice: An interdisciplinary look at labeling changes for acetaminophen and the implications for patient care. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/290

From Publication to Practice: An interdisciplinary look at advancing pain care, education, and research - Responding to the IOM’s call to action to improve pain management

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Sponsors: 
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This special publication aims to inform health care providers, researchers, policy makers, caregivers, and patients about the recent report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) that calls for overhauling the approach to pain management in the United States. The report notes that while pain affects approximately one-third of Americans - and exacts a huge toll from society in terms of morbidity, mortality, disability, demands on the health care system, and economic burden - it remains widely undertreated. The report provides an overview of needs for care, education, and research, and lays out a blueprint for transforming pain care. This issue of From Publication to Practice provides a high level summary of the IOM call to action and identifies recommendations for advancing pain care, education, and research. We believe that this latest issue in our From Publication to Practice series will assist you in identifying and responding to opportunities to improve pain management.

Educational objectives: 

After reading this publication, the provider will be able to do the following:

  1. List the underlying principles of the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) report, Relieving Pain in America.
  2. Discuss the recommendations in the blueprint put forth by the IOM to improve pain management.
  3. Describe barriers to appropriate pain management in older adults.
  4. Identify public-private partnership research opportunities.
  5. Discuss knowledge gaps that are appropriate for future study.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Institute of Medicine's (IOM) report, Relieving Pain in America

These materials were reviewed by a faculty panel.
For more educational products from the GSA, visit https://www.geron.org/Resources/Online%20Store/gsa-products

Date posted: 
Mon, 07/09/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 07/09/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
From Publication to Practice: An interdisciplinary look at advancing pain care, education, and research - Responding to the IOM’s call to action to improve pain management. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/290

From Publication to Practice: An interdisciplinary look at new developments in the prevention and treatment of influenza in older adults

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Sponsors: 
Product Information
Abstract: 
This publication provides readers with information on how new advances in disease prevention, treatment, and management may improve elder care and quality of life. Influenza infects people of all ages, but the majority of the morbidity and mortality for seasonal influenza occurs in infants and individuals with underlying cardiopulmonary, renal, endocrine, or immune-compromising disease, people who use immune-compromising medications, and those of advanced age. All of these groups at high risk for complications also tend to have a slightly reduced immune response to vaccination.
Educational objectives: 

After reading this publication, the gerontologist will be able to do the following:

  • Identify new scientific evidence supporting licensing of the first high-dose flu vaccine for use in the aging population.
  • Describe the effectiveness of the immune response in elders.
  • Discuss what considerations clinicians should take into account to help older adults be receptive to new medications.
  • Recognize the medical implications of this new treatment option.
  • Describe public health implications of this new treatment option and consideration of immunization policies for long-term care centers and health care institutions.
  • Discuss the incidences of vaccine-preventable diseases in individuals ages 65 years and older.
  • Identify resources for current information on vaccine developments, including manufacturing processes of vaccine production, and highlight new advances in production technology.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Immunization remains the best available method of protecting all age-groups from influenza. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health, while reiterating their support for the recommendation that individuals 65 years and older be vaccinated annually against influenza, have noted the need for improvement in how elders are protected against the virus.

These materials were reviewed by a faculty panel.

For more educational products from the GSA, visit https://www.geron.org/Resources/Online%20Store/gsa-products

Date posted: 
Mon, 07/09/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 07/09/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
From Publication to Practice: An interdisciplinary look at new developments in the prevention and treatment of influenza in older adults. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/290

(Y5SJI) ELDER Project: Cultural Diversity: Judaism and Islam

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

 


Both licensed and unlicensed participants discuss the role of religion, traditional health care beliefs, social values, and family structure of several different cultures and the impact these factors have on health care.



Educational objectives
  1.  
Educational objectives: 
  1. Compare and contrast the belief systems of Judaism and Islam.
  2. Discuss the role of religion, traditional health care beliefs, social values, and family structure of Judaism and Islam and the impact these factors have on health care.
  3. Identify specific culturally sensitive practices that can be incorporated into your work with Jewish and Muslim patients.
  4. Define culture and how it is reflected in our everyday lives.
  5. Distinguish between visible and invisible aspects of culture.
  6. Explain how the invisible aspects of culture influence the visible aspects of culture.
  7. Specific cultures include African American, Hispanic, Asian Indian, Jewish, Islam, Vietnamese, and Russian.
  8. Define and discuss components associated with cultural competence.
  9. Acknowledge healthcare disparities amongst cultures within healthcare.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

 

Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sun, 12/18/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y5SJI) ELDER Project: Cultural Diversity: Judaism and Islam. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/290

(Y5SJ) ELDER Project: Cultural Diversity: Jamaican Culture

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Both licensed and unlicensed participants discuss the role of religion, traditional health care beliefs, social values, and family structure of several different cultures and the impact these factors have on health care.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Discuss the role of religion, traditional health care beliefs, social values, and family structure of Jamaican Culture and the impact these factors have on health care.
  2. Identify specific culturally sensitive practices that can be incorporated into your work with Jamaican patients and American Jamaican patients.
  3. Define culture and how it is reflected in our everyday lives.
  4. Distinguish between visible and invisible aspects of culture.
  5. Explain how the invisible aspects of culture influence the visible aspects of culture.
  6. Specific cultures include African American, Hispanic, Asian Indian, Jewish, Islam, Vietnamese, and Russian.
  7. Define and discuss components associated with cultural competence.
  8. Acknowledge healthcare disparities amongst cultures within healthcare.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 
  1. The Ethno geriatric Curriculum from the RIGEC (Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center) website. · http://www.uri.edu/outreach/rigec/minority_health.html
  1. Online course designed to foster cultural competence among nurses supported by the Office of Minority Health; ·American Institutes for Research. (2002). Teaching cultural competence in health care: A review of current concepts, policies and practices. Report prepared for the Office of Minority Health. Washington, DC: Author.
  1. A Georgetown-based series on cultural awareness, self-assessment and personal identity, and communication in a multicultural environment - Gilbert, J., Goode, T. D., & Dunne, C. (2007). Cultural awareness. From the Curricula Enhancement Module Series. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development.   
  1. On-line learning experience on health literacy, Unified Health Communication 101: Addressing Health Literacy, Cultural Competency, and Limited English Proficiency, supported by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) - Links to the Tool: This tool is available at: http://www.hrsa.gov/publichealth/healthliteracy/
  1. Bernal, H.,  & Froman, R. (1993) Influences on the cultural self-efficacy of community health nurses. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 4 (2), 24-31.
  1. Camphina-Bacote, J. (2008). The process of cultural competence in the delivery of healthcare services. Retrieved December 1, 2008 from: http://www.transculturalcare.net/Publications.htm
  1. Office of Minority Health. (2007). National standards on Culturally and linguistically appropriate services (CLAS). Retrieved December 15, 2008 from http://www.omhrc.gov/templates/browse.aspx?lvl=2&lvlID=15
  1. A comprehensive curriculum in the health care of elders from diverse ethnic populations for training in all health care disciplines. It was developed by representatives from over 30 Geriatric Education Centers and includes five Core Curriculum modules and eleven Ethnic Specific Modules to be used in conjunction with the Core Curriculum. Available at http://www.stanford.edu/group/ethnoger/index.html.
  1. National Center for Cultural Competence Curricula Enhancement Module Series.  Cultural Awareness.  Retrieved on June 28th, 2010 from http://www.nccccurricula.info/awareness/index.html.  
Date posted: 
Thu, 02/14/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 02/14/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y5SJ) ELDER Project: Cultural Diversity: Jamaican Culture. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/290

(Y5SH) ELDER Project: Cultural Diversity: Haitian Culture

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Both licensed and unlicensed participants discuss the role of religion, traditional health care beliefs, social values, and family structure of several different cultures and the impact these factors have on health care.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Discuss the role of religion, traditional health care beliefs, social values, and family structure of Haitian Culture and the impact these factors have on health care.
  2. Identify specific culturally sensitive practices that can be incorporated into your work with Haitian patients and American Haitian patients.
  3. Define culture and how it is reflected in our everyday lives.
  4. Distinguish between visible and invisible aspects of culture.
  5. Explain how the invisible aspects of culture influence the visible aspects of culture.
  6. Specific cultures include African American, Hispanic, Asian Indian, Jewish, Islam, Vietnamese, and Russian.
  7. Define and discuss components associated with cultural competence.
  8. Acknowledge healthcare disparities amongst cultures within healthcare.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

 

  1. The Ethno geriatric Curriculum from the RIGEC (Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center) website. · http://www.uri.edu/outreach/rigec/minority_health.html
  1. Online course designed to foster cultural competence among nurses supported by the Office of Minority Health; ·American Institutes for Research. (2002). Teaching cultural competence in health care: A review of current concepts, policies and practices. Report prepared for the Office of Minority Health. Washington, DC: Author.
  1. A Georgetown-based series on cultural awareness, self-assessment and personal identity, and communication in a multicultural environment - Gilbert, J., Goode, T. D., & Dunne, C. (2007). Cultural awareness. From the Curricula Enhancement Module Series. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development.   
  1. On-line learning experience on health literacy, Unified Health Communication 101: Addressing Health Literacy, Cultural Competency, and Limited English Proficiency, supported by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) - Links to the Tool: This tool is available at: http://www.hrsa.gov/publichealth/healthliteracy/
  1. Bernal, H.,  & Froman, R. (1993) Influences on the cultural self-efficacy of community health nurses. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 4 (2), 24-31.
  1. Camphina-Bacote, J. (2008). The process of cultural competence in the delivery of healthcare services. Retrieved December 1, 2008 from: http://www.transculturalcare.net/Publications.htm
  1. Office of Minority Health. (2007). National standards on Culturally and linguistically appropriate services (CLAS). Retrieved December 15, 2008 from http://www.omhrc.gov/templates/browse.aspx?lvl=2&lvlID=15
  1. A comprehensive curriculum in the health care of elders from diverse ethnic populations for training in all health care disciplines. It was developed by representatives from over 30 Geriatric Education Centers and includes five Core Curriculum modules and eleven Ethnic Specific Modules to be used in conjunction with the Core Curriculum. Available at http://www.stanford.edu/group/ethnoger/index.html.
  1. National Center for Cultural Competence Curricula Enhancement Module Series.  Cultural Awareness.  Retrieved on June 28th, 2010 from http://www.nccccurricula.info/awareness/index.html.  

 

Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sun, 12/18/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y5SH) ELDER Project: Cultural Diversity: Haitian Culture. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/290

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