The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Therapist

The Einstein Geriatrics Fellowship Core Curriculum: Communication and Interviewing Skills with the Geriatric Patient

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This lecture discusses communication and interviewing skills with the geriatric patient. It is part of The Einstein Geriatrics Fellowship Core Curriculum, which is a 20 part lecture series designed for first year geriatrics fellows.

Educational objectives: 

By the end of the lecture the student should be able to:

1. Review the common modifications required for interviewing older adults including adults with visual, auditory and cognitive deficits

2. Understand the unique aspects of obtaining a geriatrics social and functional history

3. Review styles of inquiry that increase the effectiveness of interviewing older adults and their caregivers

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

The Einstein Geriatrics Fellowship Core Curriculum is a 20 part lecture series designed for first year geriatrics fellows. The series covers the content areas outlined in the ACGME program requirements for geriatrics fellowship training including: Geriatrics syndromes (Delirium, Falls, Weight Loss, Urinary Incontinence, Pressure Ulcers,) Geriatric Psychiatry, Economic Aspects of Care, Pharmacology, Sites of Geriatrics Care (LTC, Home Visiting), Functional Assessment, Preventive Medicine, Communication Skills, Sexuality, Podiatry, Ophthalmology, Audiology, Rheumatology, Dermatology, Orthopedics and Hip Fractures. The lectures are 45 minute PowerPoint presentations with extensive speaker notes. Each lecture covers a specific content area. Most lectures are also appropriate for learners at other levels including IM/FM residents and students on clinical rotations.

Date posted: 
Thu, 12/15/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 12/15/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
The Einstein Geriatrics Fellowship Core Curriculum: Communication and Interviewing Skills with the Geriatric Patient. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/252

Ethics and Spiritual Care at the End of Life

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

In our increasingly complex medical system, physicians and other healthcare providers, as well as patients and their family members, often face difficult decisions regarding end-of-life care.  In addition to being emotionally challenging, such decisions involve complex ethical considerations. Furthermore, physicians are increasingly recognizing the importance of spiritual care at all stages of treatment, but particularly when patients are facing death. For many patients, spiritual and religious beliefs and convictions play an important role in addressing end-of-life issues and informing ethically difficult decisions. This symposium will bring together physicians, healthcare providers, chaplains and spiritual care providers, and interested members of the community to examine key themes in both clinical ethics and spiritual care at the end-of-life.

Educational objectives: 
  • Gain knowledge of relevant ethical principles regarding end-of-life treatment decisions (e.g., understanding distinctions between ordinary/proportionate and extraordinary/disproportionate health care interventions.).
  • Physicians will appreciate the trends in this medical literature as it applies to their own clinical practice, and make recommendations accordingly.
  • Physicians will become more adept at discussing spiritual issues with a patient in a clinical context.
  • Physicians will understand the need for a spiritual history, and gain practical tools to use in gathering this history in a clinical setting with their elderly patients.
  • Physicians and other health professionals will enhance their cultural competence by including religious and spiritual dimensions in their consideration of cultural factors that affect and influence patients' experience of illness and medical decision making.
Date posted: 
Mon, 10/24/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 10/24/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . Ethics and Spiritual Care at the End of Life. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/252

Interdisciplinary Team Training for Learners on an Acute Care for Elders (ACE) Consultation Service

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Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

This tool is a double-sided pocket card intended to familiarize various learners with the many different functional impairments with which hospitalized elderly patients are vulnerable.  Specifically, the tool includes a set of twelve critically important areas which should receive thoughtful consideration when performing an inpatient geriatrics consultation, as well as a subset of questions for each area of functional impairment which should be sequentially addressed. This tool was developed in conjunction with the interdisciplinary team members on a well established Acute Care for Elders Consult Service in an urban, academic safety-net setting (Wishard Memorial Hospital, Indianapolis, IN), with the secondary goal of assisting learners in identifying the roles of each member of the ACE interdisciplinary team and using these team members to help answer the questions on the pocket card when the team meets to discuss the patient. While this pocket card intends to provide the foundational elements of care recommended in most patients who receive ACE consultation, there clearly may be other appropriate recommendations to apply as every patient is a unique individual, and this card is furthermore applicable to any inpatient setting where care is delivered to the elderly, with or without the presence of an ACE team.

Educational objectives: 

By using this pocket card during daily interdisciplinary teaching rounds on a one-week Acute Care for Elders Consult Service rotation, the learner will demonstrate proficiency in the following two objectives:

  1. To recognize 12 of the most common geriatric syndromes and complex care needs of the typical patient seen in Acute Care for Elders (ACE) Consultation, including goals of care & advance care planning.
  2. To be able to independently derive an appropriate list of recommendations for each of the identified syndromes and complex care needs recognized in each patient seen, incorporating the unique contributions of the members of the team.

"Proficiency" is demonstrated by the learner being able to use this pocket card as a guide to formulate appropriate assessments and plans for each patient seen in ACE consultation, taking into account the recommendations of the interdisciplinary team members which include social work, case management, nursing, physical & occupational therapy, and pharmacy.  It is further intended that learners will keep this pocket card for use when developing care plans for elderly patients in other non-geriatric venues.  Learners that will benefit from using this pocket card include medical students, family medicine and internal medicine interns and residents, medicine-pediatrics residents, geriatric fellows, and nurse practitioner / pharmacy / therapy students.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This interdisciplinary team teaching tool was developed by 3 current GACA recipients (Bowman, Nazir and James) in collaboration with one of their mentors (Westmoreland).  It was a joint process closely developed with the suggestions of nursing, therapy, pharmacy, and social work members of our team, in addition to the recommendations and guidance of the 4 authoring physicians.

The tool has been printed double-sided in color on 9 1/2 X 13 inch size paper, has been laminated for permanence and distributed to various areas of our hospital, in particular to the places where teaching rounds are conducted and where housestaff enter their notes daily into the EMR. It has also been made available to other IUSM teaching hospitals with ACE consult services who host medical trainees of varying disciplines. A non-laminated form has also been widely disseminated in the orientation materials distributed at the start of the rotation for all resident and fellow learners. The intention is that once folded it can serve as a pocket-sized tool for future reference even after the learner has rotated off the ACE service. 

Learners are strongly encouraged to carry this pocket card with them especially when seeing new hospital consults on ACE interdisciplinary teaching rounds. When encountering a learner who has difficulty synthesizing an assessment and plan based upon the patient's functional syndromes, he/she is openly encouraged to look at the card and use it as a guide for developing the plan of care. Through the use of this tool we have strived to assist new learners in "thinking like a geriatrician." A downstream effect of this tool is that we have been able to streamline the sometimes lengthy and repetitious discussions that take place during interdisciplinary teaching rounds, without compromising overall teaching time and quality (such as not having to remind learners daily to assess for tethers or prn medications given overnight). Through this process, we have found that our learners are more proactive, teaching rounds are not only more productive and conducive to learning, but most importantly there is more time for bedside teaching with the other team members leading the way because we don't spend as much time sitting at a table prompting learners to think about these issues - they have already proactively started thinking about them before rounds even begin.

This tool has been reviewed locally by IUSM senior faculty who are also mentors of authors Bowman, Nazir and James. Also closely reivewed in collaboration with all the non-physician members of our interdisciplinary team, without whom this product would not have been possible.

Date posted: 
Wed, 08/31/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 08/31/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . Interdisciplinary Team Training for Learners on an Acute Care for Elders (ACE) Consultation Service. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/252

Geriatric Learning Series: Ankle Foot Orthotics

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Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Abstract: 

A look at one of many orthotics that could be used in the geriatric population. This web module is designed for interdisciplinary training. A common lower limb orthotic is covered.

Educational objectives: 
  • Describe basic kinesiological and biomechanical principles of human joint motion.
  • Describe the design of orthoses to distribute forces to body segments.
  • Describe the influence of lower limb orthotics on gait.
  • Describe how the orthotic devices enhance functional gait
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

References:

  1. Lusardi MM, Nielsen CC. Orthotics and Prosthetics in Rehabilitation, 2nd ed.  Elsevier, 2007. ISBN 0-7506-7479-9
  2. Pictures from Lusardi & Nielsen, the internet, and Edelstein JE & Bruckner J. Orthotics: A Comprehensive Clinical Approach. SLACK Inc. 2002. ISBN 1-55642-416-7
  3. Rancho Los Amigos Gait Analysis Form:

In Shumway-Cook A, Woollacott MH. Motor Control: Translating Research into Clinical Practice, 3rded. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 2007  Rancho Los Amigos Medical Center; Physical Therapy Department and Pathokinesiology Laboratory; Downey, CA 

 

Please evaluate the product at:   https://surveys.ttuhsc.edu/wsb.dll/s/60g89a 

Date posted: 
Thu, 07/28/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 07/28/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Geriatric Learning Series: Ankle Foot Orthotics. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/252

Pharmacologic Management of Persistent Pain in Older Adults: Best Practice Recommendations

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

This is the third of three slide presentations with accompanying audio lectures by Keela Herr, PhD, RN, FAAN, AGSF, of the University of Iowa College of Nursing. 

Dr. Herr was sponsored by The University of Minnesota Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence and the American Academy of Pain Medicine/Pfizer Visiting Professorship in Pain Medicine to consult with faculty and students and present three formal lectures on the following topics:

  • Pain and Aging
  • Recognizing and Assessing Pain in Cognitively Impaired Older Adults
  • Pharmacologic Management of Persistent Pain in Older Adults.
Educational objectives: 
  • Recognizing factors impacting pharmacological pain management in older adults.
  • Discuss best practice recommendations for pharmacologic management of persistent pain in older adults.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

The University of Iowa College of Nursing's John A Hartford Foundation Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence's Evidence Based Guidelines

Date posted: 
Tue, 08/30/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 08/30/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Pharmacologic Management of Persistent Pain in Older Adults: Best Practice Recommendations. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/252

Pain and Aging: Recognizing and Assesssing Pain in Older Adults

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

This is the second of three slide presentations with accompanying audio lectures by Keela Herr, PhD, RN, FAAN, AGSF, of the University of Iowa College of Nursing. 

Dr. Herr was sponsored by The University of Minnesota Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence and the American Academy of Pain Medicine/Pfizer Visiting Professorship in Pain Medicine to consult with faculty and students and present three formal lectures on the following topics:

  • Pain and Aging
  • Recognizing and Assessing Pain in Cognitively Impaired Older Adults
  • Pharmacologic Management of Persistent Pain in Older Adults.
Educational objectives: 
  • Recognize the challenge of pain assessment in cognitively impaired older adults.
  • Describe strategies for recognizing and assessing pain in cognitively impaired older adults.
Date posted: 
Tue, 08/30/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 08/30/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Pain and Aging: Recognizing and Assesssing Pain in Older Adults. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/252

Pain and Aging: Challenges and Barriers to Managing Pain in Older Adults

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

This is the first of three slide presentations with accompanying audio lectures by Keela Herr, PhD, RN, FAAN, AGSF, of the University of Iowa College of Nursing. 

Dr. Herr was sponsored by The University of Minnesota Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence and the American Academy of Pain Medicine/Pfizer Visiting Professorship in Pain Medicine to consult with faculty and students and present three formal lectures on the following topics:

  • Pain and Aging
  • Recognizing and Assessing Pain in Cognitively Impaired Older Adults
  • Pharmacologic Management of Persistent Pain in Older Adults.
Educational objectives: 
  • Identify challenges and barriers that impact quality pain care in older adults.
  • Discuss strategies for improving pain management in older persons.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Integration of non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic strategies.

Date posted: 
Tue, 08/30/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 08/30/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Pain and Aging: Challenges and Barriers to Managing Pain in Older Adults. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/252

End of Life Care 7: Optimizing Quality of Life in End of Life care: The Role of Physical & Occupational Therapy

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Abstract: 

The quality of life refers to the perceived emotional, psychological and physical well-being. It is subjective and an individualized phenomenon. Health related quality of life outcomes includes physical, mental, social and role functioning, a sense of well being, freedom from bodily pain, satisfaction with health care and an overall sense of general health. (Field & Casse, 1996, p.25)

The concept of this module is to give healthcare professionals and students an understanding of the quality of life, physical and occupational therapy role and modules of care in therapies used to care for patients at the end of life.

Educational objectives: 

Upon completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Recognize ways to enhance quality of life at the end of life using therapy services.
  • Describe the role of occupational and physical therapy for patients experiencing end of life.
  • Identify appropriate therapy outcomes for these patients.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Technical Requirements and Notes: This learning module uses Adobe Flash media and may require you to add a browser "plug-in" in order to display properly. Most computers already have this free plug-in installed. But, if yours does not, it is very easy to download and install. Try the module first because the software is "smart" enough to detect the Flash player. If the module doesn't begin, you will be automatically prompted to download the plug-in. The module contains links to external websites which will open in a new browser window. Your browser's back button will not return to the module, so these new windows should be closed.

In order to track your progress, you must create an account and fill out a brief demographic profile. Once the profile has been created, you can log directly into the course.

Date posted: 
Mon, 06/13/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 06/13/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . End of Life Care 7: Optimizing Quality of Life in End of Life care: The Role of Physical & Occupational Therapy. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/252

End of Life Care 6: Symptom Management in End of Life Care

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Abstract: 

Symptom management at the end of life involves assessing and treating psychical and nonphysical symptoms to help prevent suffering and improve quality of life.

The concept of this module is to give healthcare professionals and students an understanding of various symptoms experienced at the end of life, assessment tools used for symptom management, pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments utilized for these symptoms.

Educational objectives: 

Upon completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Describe symptoms commonly seen in End of Life Care.
  • Discuss possible causes and assessment for these common symptoms.
  • Provide pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions to help relieve these symptoms.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Technical Requirements and Notes: This learning module uses Adobe Flash media and may require you to add a browser "plug-in" in order to display properly. Most computers already have this free plug-in installed. But, if yours does not, it is very easy to download and install. Try the module first because the software is "smart" enough to detect the Flash player. If the module doesn't begin, you will be automatically prompted to download the plug-in. The module contains links to external websites which will open in a new browser window. Your browser's back button will not return to the module, so these new windows should be closed.

In order to track your progress, you must create an account and fill out a brief demographic profile. Once the profile has been created, you can log directly into the course.

Date posted: 
Mon, 06/13/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 06/13/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . End of Life Care 6: Symptom Management in End of Life Care. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/252

End of Life Care 5: Pain Management in End of Life Care

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Abstract: 

Effectively managing pain requires that healthcare providers understand the types of pain, as well as the assessments utilized to measure pain and the treatments to manage pain.

The concept of this module is to give healthcare professionals and students an understanding of the types of pain experienced at the end of life, pain assessment and pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments used for pain.

Educational objectives: 

Upon completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Describe the types of pain.
  • Discuss the components of comprehensive pain assessment.
  • Discuss the barriers to effective pain management.
  • Discuss pharmacological treatment for pain.
  • Discuss non-pharmacologic management of pain.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Technical Requirements and Notes: This learning module uses Adobe Flash media and may require you to add a browser "plug-in" in order to display properly. Most computers already have this free plug-in installed. But, if yours does not, it is very easy to download and install. Try the module first because the software is "smart" enough to detect the Flash player. If the module doesn't begin, you will be automatically prompted to download the plug-in. The module contains links to external websites which will open in a new browser window. Your browser's back button will not return to the module, so these new windows should be closed.

In order to track your progress, you must create an account and fill out a brief demographic profile. Once the profile has been created, you can log directly into the course.

Date posted: 
Mon, 06/13/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 06/13/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , and . End of Life Care 5: Pain Management in End of Life Care. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/252

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