The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

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Elder Care: A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Resilience in Aging

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Resilience in Aging is one of a continuing series of practical, evidence based, Provider Fact Sheets which summarize key geriatric topics and provide clinically useful assessments and interventions. Initially developed for remote, rural clinical sites, they are useful for students and health care professionals from many fields and across a very broad range of health care settings.

Educational objectives: 

After reading this issue of Elder Care, you should be able to…

  1. Define resilience in aging.
  2. Name the three hallmarks of resilience in aging
  3. Identify questions that you can ask patients to assess their resilience
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Subscribers to POGOe are free to reprint Elder Care on their own stationery or in other publications without obtaining specific permission, so long as 

  1. content is not changed,
  2. no one is charged a fee to use or read the publication,
  3. authors and their affiliated institutions are noted without change, and
  4. the reprint includes the following statement: “Reprinted courtesy of the Arizona Reynolds Program of Applied Geriatrics and the Arizona Geriatric Education Center."

For more information on this series, go to http://www.reynolds.med.arizona.edu/EduProducts/El...

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

The Elder Care provider sheets are occasionally published in the Arizona Geriatrics Society Journal, which is published twice yearly.

Date posted: 
Fri, 06/30/2017
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 06/30/2017
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . Elder Care: A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Resilience in Aging. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2017 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/246

Interprofessional Geriatric Oncology 3: The Older Adult Oncology Patient and Nutrition

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Nutrition for the older adult with cancer needs to be assessed in a comprehensive manner to promote quality of life. An interprofessional approach should be used for nutrition management. This module examines nutrition in the older adult with cancer in regards to nutritional assessment, risk factors, proper oral care, tips and support in managing nutrition effectively.

Educational objectives: 

Upon completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Utilize oral and nutritional assessments.
  • Describe the goals of nutritional therapy during chemotherapy.
  • Discuss physiologic conditions related to nutrition in the older adult with cancer.
  • Recognize the effect of these conditions on the nutritional status of the patient.
  • Identify nutritional needs and dietary preferences.
  • Discuss nutritional supplements.
  • Understand the benefits/drawbacks of nutrition and hydration at the end of life.
  • State pharmacologic interventions and vitamin and mineral supplements for end of life care.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Technical Requirements and Notes:

This learning module uses Adobe Flash media and may require you to add a browser "plug-in" in order to display properly. Most computers already have this free plug-in installed. But, if yours does not, it is very easy to download and install. Try the module first because the software is "smart" enough to detect the Flash player. If the module doesn't begin, you will be automatically prompted to download the plug-in.

The module contains links to external websites which will open in a new browser window. Your browser's back button will not return to the module, so these new windows should be closed.

In order to track your progress, you must create an account and fill out a brief demographic profile. Once the profile has been created, you can log directly into the course.

Date posted: 
Fri, 09/28/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 09/28/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . Interprofessional Geriatric Oncology 3: The Older Adult Oncology Patient and Nutrition. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/246

Interprofessional Geriatric Oncology 1: Risk Assessment Treatment Options in Older Adults with Cancer

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Sixty percent of new cancers are diagnosed in patients 65 years and older. Cancer is the leading cause of death for men and women age 60-79. Healthcare professionals are making strides in addressing this issue through comprehensive risk assessments and exams to identify the issue early; as well as provide the patient with treatment options for care. This module examines geriatric oncology, assessments and treatment options for older adults with cancer.

Educational objectives: 

Upon completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  1. Provide a geriatric perspective on cancer care
  2. Discuss the importance of individual risk assessment for cancer treatment options
  3. Discuss decision-making points for older adults with cancer and the cultural factors that influence decision-making.
  4. Recognize the legal and ethical concepts that influence health professionals ability to assist in decision-making with patients and families.
  5. Discuss the physiologic effects of cancer and cancer treatment on the nutritional status of older adults and provide methods to assess and offer nutritional support
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Technical Requirements and Notes:

This learning module uses Adobe Flash media and may require you to add a browser "plug-in" in order to display properly. Most computers already have this free plug-in installed. But, if yours does not, it is very easy to download and install. Try the module first because the software is "smart" enough to detect the Flash player. If the module doesn't begin, you will be automatically prompted to download the plug-in.

The module contains links to external websites which will open in a new browser window. Your browser's back button will not return to the module, so these new windows should be closed.

In order to track your progress, you must create an account and fill out a brief demographic profile. Once the profile has been created, you can log directly into the course.

Date posted: 
Wed, 08/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 08/01/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . Interprofessional Geriatric Oncology 1: Risk Assessment Treatment Options in Older Adults with Cancer. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/246

Elder Care: A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Elder Abuse: Clinician Reporting

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Elder Abuse: Clinician Reporting is one of a continuing series of practical, evidence based, Provider Fact Sheets which summarize key geriatric topics and provide clinically useful assessments and interventions. Initially developed for remote, rural clinical sites, they are useful for students and health care professionals from many fields and across a very broad range of health care settings.

Educational objectives: 

After reading this issue of Elder Care, you should be able to…

  1. Identify reasons why clinicians fail to report elder abuse to Adult Protective Service (APS) agencies
  2. State current recommendations about screening for elder abuse
  3. Report suspected elder abuse to APS and know what to expect in terms of a response from APS.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Subscribers to POGOe are free to reprint Elder Care on their own stationery or in other publications without obtaining specific permission, so long as

  1. content is not changed,
  2. no one is charged a fee to use or read the publication,
  3. authors and their affiliated institutions are noted without change, and
  4. the reprint includes the following statement: “Reprinted courtesy of the Arizona Reynolds Program of Applied Geriatrics and the Arizona Geriatric Education Center."
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

The Elder Care provider sheets are occasionally published in the Arizona Geriatrics Society Journal, which is published twice yearly. (Available at www.reynolds.med.arizona.edu/EduProducts/ElderCareProviderSheets.cfm)

Date posted: 
Wed, 02/29/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 03/14/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . Elder Care: A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Elder Abuse: Clinician Reporting. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/246

From Publication to Practice: An interdisciplinary look at labeling changes for acetaminophen and the implications for patient care

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This special publication aims to inform health care providers, researchers, policy makers, caregivers, and patients about recent changes to acetaminophen labeling as required by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. While acetaminophen is the most widely used analgesic in America, it is also the leading cause of acute liver failure, usually as a result of inadvertent overdose. Several significant changes to the packaging and labeling of over-the-counter and prescription products containing acetaminophen have occurred recently, and other major developments are anticipated shortly. In order to accomplish the goal of improving patient safety, these changes must be understood by clinicians and patients alike. This issue of From Publication to Practice provides you with essential information on the new labeling changes and describes the resulting implications for patient care, especially for older patients. It also presents important steps that clinicians can take when educating patients. We believe that this latest report in our From Publication to Practice series will assist you in developing and enhancing your pain management services.

Educational objectives: 

After reading this publication, the provider will be able to:

  1. Describe labeling changes for acetaminophen and the safety concerns that led to the changes.
  2. Discuss specific issues surrounding the labeling changes that impact patient care for older adults.
  3. Recommend dosage adjustments for older patients taking acetaminophen.
  4. Effectively communicate with older adults about the critical need to follow new acetaminophen dosage recommendations and directions for use.
  5. Discuss pain management guidelines for older patients in pain, including alternative medications and therapies.
  6. Identify resources and new initiatives supporting safe use of acetaminophen.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

These materials were reviewed by a faculty panel.

For more educational products from the GSA, visit https://www.geron.org/Resources/Online%20Store/gsa-products

Date posted: 
Mon, 07/09/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 07/09/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
From Publication to Practice: An interdisciplinary look at labeling changes for acetaminophen and the implications for patient care. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/246

From Publication to Practice: An interdisciplinary look at advancing pain care, education, and research - Responding to the IOM’s call to action to improve pain management

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Sponsors: 
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This special publication aims to inform health care providers, researchers, policy makers, caregivers, and patients about the recent report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) that calls for overhauling the approach to pain management in the United States. The report notes that while pain affects approximately one-third of Americans - and exacts a huge toll from society in terms of morbidity, mortality, disability, demands on the health care system, and economic burden - it remains widely undertreated. The report provides an overview of needs for care, education, and research, and lays out a blueprint for transforming pain care. This issue of From Publication to Practice provides a high level summary of the IOM call to action and identifies recommendations for advancing pain care, education, and research. We believe that this latest issue in our From Publication to Practice series will assist you in identifying and responding to opportunities to improve pain management.

Educational objectives: 

After reading this publication, the provider will be able to do the following:

  1. List the underlying principles of the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) report, Relieving Pain in America.
  2. Discuss the recommendations in the blueprint put forth by the IOM to improve pain management.
  3. Describe barriers to appropriate pain management in older adults.
  4. Identify public-private partnership research opportunities.
  5. Discuss knowledge gaps that are appropriate for future study.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Institute of Medicine's (IOM) report, Relieving Pain in America

These materials were reviewed by a faculty panel.
For more educational products from the GSA, visit https://www.geron.org/Resources/Online%20Store/gsa-products

Date posted: 
Mon, 07/09/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 07/09/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
From Publication to Practice: An interdisciplinary look at advancing pain care, education, and research - Responding to the IOM’s call to action to improve pain management. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/246

From Publication to Practice: An interdisciplinary look at new developments in the prevention and treatment of influenza in older adults

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Sponsors: 
Product Information
Abstract: 
This publication provides readers with information on how new advances in disease prevention, treatment, and management may improve elder care and quality of life. Influenza infects people of all ages, but the majority of the morbidity and mortality for seasonal influenza occurs in infants and individuals with underlying cardiopulmonary, renal, endocrine, or immune-compromising disease, people who use immune-compromising medications, and those of advanced age. All of these groups at high risk for complications also tend to have a slightly reduced immune response to vaccination.
Educational objectives: 

After reading this publication, the gerontologist will be able to do the following:

  • Identify new scientific evidence supporting licensing of the first high-dose flu vaccine for use in the aging population.
  • Describe the effectiveness of the immune response in elders.
  • Discuss what considerations clinicians should take into account to help older adults be receptive to new medications.
  • Recognize the medical implications of this new treatment option.
  • Describe public health implications of this new treatment option and consideration of immunization policies for long-term care centers and health care institutions.
  • Discuss the incidences of vaccine-preventable diseases in individuals ages 65 years and older.
  • Identify resources for current information on vaccine developments, including manufacturing processes of vaccine production, and highlight new advances in production technology.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Immunization remains the best available method of protecting all age-groups from influenza. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health, while reiterating their support for the recommendation that individuals 65 years and older be vaccinated annually against influenza, have noted the need for improvement in how elders are protected against the virus.

These materials were reviewed by a faculty panel.

For more educational products from the GSA, visit https://www.geron.org/Resources/Online%20Store/gsa-products

Date posted: 
Mon, 07/09/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 07/09/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
From Publication to Practice: An interdisciplinary look at new developments in the prevention and treatment of influenza in older adults. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/246

(Y6S1) ELDER Project: Palliative Care - Basic Principles

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This session is based on the ELNEC (End of Life Nursing Educational Consortium) curriculum and contains activities and information regarding best practices in end of life care. The module focuses on basic principles of palliative care including dying well, sources of suffering, life closure, quality of life, causes of death, interdisciplinary teams, and hospice services and billing. There are several suggested group activities. Both licensed and unlicensed professionals are the target audience.

Educational objectives: 
By the end of the session, the participant will be able to:
  1. Discuss the concept of “dying well” and how it applies to end-of-life (EOL) care.
  2. Compare and contrast the concepts of palliative care and hospice care.
  3. Describe the role of the health care team in providing quality palliative care for elder patients in various care settings.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

City of Hope & the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2007; Revised, 2010. The End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC)- Geriatric Training Program and Curriculum is a project of the City of Hope (Betty R. Ferrell, PhD, FAAN, Principal Investigator) in collaboration with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (Pam Malloy, RN, MN, OCN, Co-Investigator).

American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2009). End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) Factsheet. Retrieved February 9, 2009, from http://www.aacn.nche.edu/elnec/about.htm
Wilkie, D. J., Judge, M. K., Wells, M. J., & Berkley, I. M. (2001). Excellence in teaching end-of-life care: A new multimedia toolkit for nurse educators. Nursing and Health Care Perspectives, 22, 226 -230.

http://www.ct.gov/longtermcare/cwp/view.asp?a=1398...
©2001 D.J. Wilkie & TNEEL Investigators

Date posted: 
Mon, 06/25/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 06/25/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y6S1) ELDER Project: Palliative Care - Basic Principles. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/246

(Y4S5) ELDER Project Teams and Teamwork: Leadership

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This module begins to explore the importance and benefits of working as a collaborative team within the geriatric setting. Working as a team achieves resutls with geriatric patients that individuals within the team can not achieve in isolation.  Session five focuses on leadership within teams, and topics include: views on leadership; leadership styles; shifts of leadership within a team; functions and tasks of the leader. Activities include having the team create one picture from fragments of pictures without talking.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Discuss current views on leadership.
  2. Examine1 the shift of leadership on teams.
  3. Identify functions of leadership.
  4. Describe leadership tasks and maintenance functions of an effective interdisciplinary team.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

GITT Resource Center of the John A. Hartford Foundation Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training Program. (2003). GITT. New York: New York

Tower Building Activity: For Team Building developed by: Donald E. Gibson, Ph.D., Professor of Management, Chair, Management Department, Charles F. Dolan School of Business, Fairfield University

Zoom. Banyai (1995).New York: Viking/Penguin

Re-Zoom.  Banyai, I (1998). New York: Viking/Penguin

Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sun, 12/18/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y4S5) ELDER Project Teams and Teamwork: Leadership. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/246

(Y4S4) ELDER Project Teams and Teamwork: Communication

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This module begins to explore the importance and benefits of working as a collaborative team within the geriatric setting. Working as a team achieves results with geriatric patients that individuals within the team cannot achieve in isolation.  Session four includes topics such as identification of barriers to communication, use of effective communication, and use of diverse styles of communication to contribute to team function. A coaching exercise is included in the materials.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Identify barriers that affect communication exchange among providers, patients, their families, and communities.
  2. Examine some effective communication tools and techniques that will contribute to good team function.
  3. Describe how diverse styles of communication contribute to team function. 
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

GITT Resource Center of the John A. Hartford Foundation Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training Program. (2003). GITT. New York: New York

Tower Building Activity: For Team Building developed by: Donald E. Gibson, Ph.D., Professor of Management, Chair, Management Department, Charles F. Dolan School of Business, Fairfield University

Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sun, 12/18/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y4S4) ELDER Project Teams and Teamwork: Communication. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/246

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