The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Physical Diagnosis

Geriatric Days Lecture/Small Group Series

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

A series of lectures and case discussions with small group interaction. Designed for M-2 level. Contains lectures, handouts, and case discussion materials on: Dementia, Delirium, Urinary Incontinence, Functional Ability and Disabilities, Falls, Aging Physiology, and End of Life Care. Will send materials upon request. Please email jwhittin@unmc.edu.

Educational objectives: 

To introduce and integrate basic geriatric knowledge in preparation for clinical years. FALLS Learners should be able to: 1) Describe the significance of falls. 2) List the age related changes that predispose to falls. 3) List the medications that predispose to falls. 4) List the etiologies of falling. 5) Describe the evaluation of a fallen elder. 6) List the techniques and treatments to prevent falls. DEMENTIA The student will be able to: 1) Understand essential elements of history in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of dementia. 2) Describe aspects of the neurological exam essential to diagnosis of the causes a dementing illness. 3) Recognize motor systems such as tremor, gait problems, rigidity, and involuntary movements. DELIRIUM The student will be able to: 1) Define delirium. 2) Describe the clinical presentation of delirium. 3) List the major causes and contributing factors to delirium. 4) Initiate prevention of delirium. 5) Initiate management of delirium. URINARY INCONTINENCE IN ELDERLY PEOPLE The student will be able to: 1) Identify risk factors for urinary incontinence. 2) Describe the four most common types of chronic urinary incontinence. 3) Identify reversible contributors to urinary incontinence. 4) Describe the treatment options for each type of incontinence. 5) Develop a treatment plan for patients with urinary incontinence. PHYSIOLOGY OF AGING The student will be able to: 1) Translate understanding of physiologic alterations into clinical interventions to reduce morbidity and mortality. 2) Identify the clinical scenarios where altered physiology is likely to make a difference in the clinical course of patients. ABILITIES & DISABILITIES The student will be able to: 1) Describe the common causes and patterns of functional disabilities. 2) Perform an initial evaluation and initiate treatment planning. 3) Describe the role of the physician in the recognition and management of disabilities. 4) Describe the strategies for minimizing the occurrence and for recovering function.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Will send materials upon request. Please email jwhittin@unmc.edu.

Date posted: 
Thu, 08/06/2009
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 04/16/2010
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Geriatric Days Lecture/Small Group Series. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2009 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/224

Geriatric Functional Assessment Standardized Patient Instructor: Medical Student Manual

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

The Geriatric Functional Assessment Standardized Patient Instructor: Medical Student Manual is used as a reference for the GFA SPI at the University of Michigan Medical School. The manual provides medical students at all levels with focused instruction and references for assessment tools and communication skills used to assess mobility, cognition, and affective disorders in older patients.

Educational objectives: 

Learners should be able to: 1. List the basic activities of daily living and independent activities of daily living. 2. Identify assessment tools useful in detecting impairment in mobility, cognitive impairment, and affective disorders in geriatric patients. 3. List the steps necessary to perform the Timed Up and Go Test, the Mini-Cog screen for dementia, and the Two Question Depression Screening Tool. 4. Identify communication problems in geriatric patients, and strategies to improve communication.

Date posted: 
Tue, 09/22/2009
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sat, 09/15/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . Geriatric Functional Assessment Standardized Patient Instructor: Medical Student Manual. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2009 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/224

Student Senior Partners Program (SSPP)

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

SSPP is the cornerstone of the geriatrics education program for medical students at UCI. Each first year medical student is partnered with an older adult who lives in the local community. Each pair of students interacts with their senior partner for each module. These partnerships are designed to be maintained through the first three years of the students' predoctoral education. Three SSPP modules, each consisting of a preparatory didactic presentation, the student/senior encounter (at the senior partner's home), and a faculty-facilitated small-group discussion, are scheduled for each of the first three years of undergraduate medical education. They are incorporated into the times dedicated to geriatrics as a content theme in the required courses listed below. Scheduled student/senior interactions have both structured educational objectives and enough flexibility to make use of other learning opportunities as they arise.

Educational objectives: 

<p>
Basic training in healthy aging/history taking, transitions, functional assessment, cardiovascular/pulmonary issues, community resources, pharmacology issues, preventative health, advance directives, and closing a patient/physician relationship. Learners should be able to: 1. List at least three patient/doctor communication "tips" and identify personal goals for the students’ own healthy aging. 2. Discuss the role of loss and life transitions in working with older adults and identify your own coping mechanisms and those used by your senior partner. 3. Demonstrate the process of conducting a mini mental status exam (MMSE) and demonstrate an understanding of how to use the Tinettti Gait and Balance Exam. 4. Demonstrate proper techniques for physical examination, including vital signs and orthostatic blood pressures and discuss strategies to prevent cardiovascular and pulmonary disease in older adults. 5. Recognize older adults' needs for community resources. 6. Increase your knowledge about community resources that maintain or improve the health of older adults. 7. Discuss strategies to prescribe appropriately and to avoid polypharmacy, and discuss age-associated changes in pharmokinetics and pharmacodynamics. 8. Determine what screening tests are appropriate for patients 65 and older and research one recommendation relevant to your senior partner. 9. Determine the beliefs of your senior partner regarding aggressiveness of care and discuss and document an advance health care decision with your senior partner. 10. Discuss strategies to end a patient-physician relationship in a professional manner. 11. Participate in an evaluation and improvement process of the SSPP program.</p>

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Used with 500 1st-4th year undergrad and faculty in medical school classes. Faculty need to facilitate the small groups.

Date posted: 
Fri, 12/01/2006
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 12/18/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . Student Senior Partners Program (SSPP). POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2006 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/224

Palliative Care - Interactive Patient Care Simulation

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

This product is part of the GeriaSims series of interactive patient care simulations. In this simulation, learners ask history questions, perform virtual physical exams, order tests, consult with specialists and other health care professionals, and make decisions about diagnosis, treatment, and other issues in the care of an elderly patient with terminal cancer, and receive feedback about all actions and decisions. Learners may also ask questions of a simulated mentor to access didactic information about palliative care. Depending on the learner's level of experience and interest, the simulation takes one to two hours to complete.

GeriaSims interactive patient care simulations are available online, both to accredited medical education institutions for use with students, residents, and fellows. For more information about the GeriaSims series, go to http://www.healthcare.uiowa.edu/igec/resources-edu....

GeriaSims are also available to practicing physicians, physician assistants, nurses and nurse practitioners for CME or CEU credit. To receive continuing education credit, you must register for the Geriatric Lecture Series. For more information, go to http://www.healthcare.uiowa.edu/igec/e-learning/ge....

Educational objectives: 

GeriaSims are interactive experiences during which the learner diagnoses and treats simulated patients. The simulations are designed to provide interactive learning experiences about geriatric syndromes and other issues that are often encountered in the primary care of elderly patients. Learners will be able to improve their overall knowledge about managing common geriatric syndromes; understand the unique health care needs of older patients, differences in the management of common clinical conditions, and how physiologic changes associated with aging impact management. They will develop a working knowledge of important legal and ethical issues associated with end-of-life care; and understand and apply principles of the multi-disciplinary geriatric assessment.

The learning objectives of this particular simulation are:

  1. Perform a proper assessment of a patient in pain.
  2. Deliver "bad news" effectively and compassionately.
  3. Appropriately prescribe medications for control of pain and non-pain symptoms.
  4. Explain the basics of hospice care.
  5. Counsel a patient on advance directives.
  6. Manage a complex patient over the telephone.
  7. Address the common challenges encountered in the care of the imminently dying patient.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

These simulations were developed using a software template created by the University of Iowa. They are used in primary care residency programs and rotations for medical students in the clinical years at the University of Iowa, and also offered online for CME credit.

To use GeriaSims, a 256K or faster DSL, cable modem, LAN/Intranet, or other broadband Internet connection; Internet Explorer 6.0 or higher, Netscape 8.0 or higher, Firefox 1.0 or higher, Mozilla 1.7.5 or higher, or Safari 1.3 or higher web browser, with Java script enabled; version 8 or later of the Flash Player; and Adobe Reader 5 or later are required. A sound card and speakers are recommended. GeriaSims are best viewed at a screen resolution of 1024 x 768, but can be viewed at 800 x 600.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Lim, L. S., Kandavelou, K. and Khan, N. (2012, June). Palliative Care Teaching in Medical Residency: A Review of Two POGOe Teaching Products. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 60, 1141-1144. doi: 10.1111/j.1532-5415.2012.03964.x

Date posted: 
Fri, 08/21/2009
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 08/21/2009
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . Palliative Care - Interactive Patient Care Simulation. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2009 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/224

Ischemic Stroke in the Elderly

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

This product is part of the GeriaSims series of interactive patient care simulations. In this simulation, learners ask history questions, perform virtual physical exams, order tests, consult with specialists and other health care professionals. They will make decisions about diagnosis, treatment, and other issues in the care of an elderly patient with functional problems, and receive feedback about all actions and decisions. Learners may also ask questions of a simulated mentor to access didactic information about functional assessment. Depending on the learner's level of experience and interest, the simulation takes one to two hours to complete.

GeriaSims interactive patient care simulations are available online, both to accredited medical education institutions for use with students, residents, and fellows. For more information about the GeriaSims series, go to http://www.healthcare.uiowa.edu/igec/resources-edu....

GeriaSims are also available to practicing physicians, physician assistants, nurses and nurse practitioners for CME or CEU credit. To receive continuing education credit, you must register for the Geriatric Lecture Series. For more information, go to http://www.healthcare.uiowa.edu/igec/e-learning/ge....

Educational objectives: 

GeriaSims are interactive experiences during which the learner diagnoses and treats simulated patients. The simulations are designed to provide interactive learning experiences about geriatric syndromes and other issues that are often encountered in the primary care of elderly patients. Learners will be able to improve their overall knowledge about managing common geriatric syndromes and understand the unique health care needs of older patients. They will learn the differences in the management of common clinical conditions, and how physiologic changes associated with aging impact management; develop a working knowledge of important legal and ethical issues associated with end-of-life care; and understand and apply principles of the multi-disciplinary geriatric assessment.

The learning objectives of this particular simulation are:

  1. Diagnose the location, severity, and cause of a stroke.
  2. Determine an appropriate acute treatment plan for a patient who has suffered an ischemic stroke.
  3. Correctly administer t-PA.
  4. Monitor a patient for complications and response to the acute treatment plan.
  5. Avoid complications from a stroke, such as DVT, aspiration pneumonia, and arrhythmia.
  6. Develop a plan for rehabilitation following a stroke.
  7. Develop a treatment plan to prevent future strokes.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

These simulations were developed using a software template created by the University of Iowa. They are used in primary care residency programs and rotations for medical students in the clinical years at the University of Iowa, and also offered online for CME credit.

To use GeriaSims, a 256K or faster DSL, cable modem, LAN/Intranet, or other broadband Internet connection; Internet Explorer 6.0 or higher, Netscape 8.0 or higher, Firefox 1.0 or higher, Mozilla 1.7.5 or higher, or Safari 1.3 or higher web browser, with Java script enabled; version 8 or later of the Flash Player; and Adobe Reader 5 or later are required. A sound card and speakers are recommended. GeriaSims are best viewed at a screen resolution of 1024 x 768, but can be viewed at 800 x 600.

Date posted: 
Fri, 08/21/2009
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 08/21/2009
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Ischemic Stroke in the Elderly. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2009 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/224

Failure to Thrive

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

This product is part of the GeriaSims series of interactive patient care simulations. In this simulation, learners ask history questions, perform virtual physical exams, order tests, and consult with specialists and other health care professionals. They make decisions about diagnosis, treatment, and other issues in the care of an elderly patient with severe weight loss, and receive feedback about all actions and decisions. Learners may also ask questions of a simulated mentor to access didactic information about failure to thrive. Depending on the learner's level of experience and interest, the simulation takes one to two hours to complete.

GeriaSims interactive patient care simulations are available online, both to accredited medical education institutions for use with students, residents, and fellows. For more information about the GeriaSims series, go to http://www.healthcare.uiowa.edu/igec/resources-edu....

GeriaSims are also available to practicing physicians, physician assistants, nurses and nurse practitioners for CME or CEU credit. To receive continuing education credit, you must register for the Geriatric Lecture Series. For more information, go to http://www.healthcare.uiowa.edu/igec/e-learning/ge....

Educational objectives: 

GeriaSims are interactive experiences during which the learner diagnoses and treats simulated patients. The simulations are designed to provide interactive learning experiences about geriatric syndromes and other issues that are often encountered in the primary care of elderly patients. Learners will be able to improve their overall knowledge about managing common geriatric syndromes and will understand the unique health care needs of older patients. They will learn about differences in the management of common clinical conditions, and how physiologic changes associated with aging impact management. They will develop a working knowledge of important legal and ethical issues associated with end-of-life care; and understand and apply principles of the multi-disciplinary geriatric assessment.

The learning objectives of this particular simulation are:

  1. Recognize the clinical presentation of undernutrition.
  2. Identify the common contributing causes of undernutrition in community-dwelling elders.
  3. Develop a plan, including tests and consults, to evaluate weight loss in an older adult.
  4. Determine which factors precipitating a patient's failure to thrive are potentially reversible.
  5. Formulate a treatment plan to correct a patient's failure to thrive. 6. Recognize when to call on the expertise or programs offered by other practitioners.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

These simulations were developed using a software template created by the University of Iowa. They are used in primary care residency programs and rotations for medical students in the clinical years at the University of Iowa, and also offered online for CME credit.

To use GeriaSims, a 256K or faster DSL, cable modem, LAN/Intranet, or other broadband Internet connection; Internet Explorer 6.0 or higher, Netscape 8.0 or higher, Firefox 1.0 or higher, Mozilla 1.7.5 or higher, or Safari 1.3 or higher web browser, with Java script enabled; version 8 or later of the Flash Player; and Adobe Reader 5 or later are required. A sound card and speakers are recommended. GeriaSims are best viewed at a screen resolution of 1024 x 768, but can be viewed at 800 x 600.

Date posted: 
Fri, 08/21/2009
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 08/21/2009
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Failure to Thrive. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2009 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/224

Urinary Incontinence

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Abstract: 

This web-based module for third-year medical students reviews acute and established forms of urinary incontinence, clinical features, and the importance of history and exam in evaluating this geriatric syndrome.  Nonpharmacologic, pharmacologic, and invasive treatments are presented in appropriate detail for a student learner. Faculty-led small group discussions focus on the cases for application of the content.  One of several goals of the cases is to increase the learner’s sensitivity to the social and emotional consequences of urinary incontinence. 

Educational objectives: 
  1. Relate potential social and emotional consequences of incontinence.
  2. List at least 5 potential etiologies for acute (transient) urinary incontinence.
  3. Describe features of the 4 types of chronic (established) physiologic urinary incontinence.
  4. Identify age-related changes that may predispose older adults to develop incontinence.
  5. Describe the complex physiology involved in normal micturition.
  6. Discuss potential pathophysiologic causes of incontinence.
  7. Discuss important features of history, exam and testing in evaluating a patient with UI.
  8. Identify various nonpharmacologic treatments with appropriate conditions/situations for their use.
  9. Cite examples of pharmacologic treatment for SUI, OAB/UUI, and Overflow UI.
  10. Relate specific concerns of antimuscarinic agents in older adults, and examples of choices to minimize risk.
  11. Explain the IFIS risk for patients who have used alpha-adrenergic antagonists as a class, and tamsulosin in particular.
  12. Discuss urology referral for various invasive treatment interventions.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This product is reviewed internally each year by the program core faculty.

DeMaagd, G., & Geibing, J. D.  (2006).  An overview of overactive bladder and its pharmacological management with a focus on anticholinergic drugs.  P&T; 31(8); 462-474.  Available online at: http://www.ptcommunity.com/ptjournal/fulltext/31/8/PTJ3108462.pdf

[Note:  the student is directed to the excellent discussion of anticholinergic and antimuscarinic pharmacology in this Pharmacy and Therapeutics article.]

DeMaagd, G. (2007).  Urinary incontinence:  Treatment update with a focus on pharmacological management.  U. S. Pharmacist; 32(6):34-44.  Available online at: http://www.uspharmacist.com/content/t/urology/c/10310/

Haas, P.  (2008, July 2).  Consider cataracts before prescribing alpha blockers for your patients.  AAFP News Now.   Available online at:  http://www.aafp.org/online/en/home/publications/news/news-now/clinical-care-research/20080702alpha-cataract.html

Ellsworth, P., & Kirshenbaum, E.  (2010). Update on the pharmacologic management of overactive bladder:  The present and the future.  Available online at:  http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/718789 (posted April 7, 2010)

Date posted: 
Thu, 07/28/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 07/28/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . Urinary Incontinence. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/224

Standardized Patient: Bessie Arnold

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

Bessie Arnold was developed as part of a multi-station, standardized patient assessment. The student's performance is measured by checklists filled out by the standardized patient and by the evaluation of responses to written questions on the interstation exercise. This patient is a 65 year old female who presents to the outpatient clinic with increasing urinary incontinence. The student's task is to obtain a focused history and perform a focused physical examination. A complete set of student instructions, checklists, standardized patient training materials, written exercises and a grading key are included. The associated documents are available to faculty members only. 

Educational objectives: 

Evaluation of geriatrics clinical skills related to a patient with urinary incontinence.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This standardized patient has been used as part of a clinical skills assessment for medical students, internal medicine residents and geriatric medicine fellows.

Date posted: 
Thu, 01/01/2009
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 07/27/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . Standardized Patient: Bessie Arnold. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2009 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/224

FEEBLE FALLERS ARE FRAIL (Acronym for domains in comprehensive geriatric assessment)

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

This is a mnemonic tool designed for conducting multi-disciplinary comprehensive geriatric assessment.

Educational objectives: 

Learners should be able to recall all important domains in comprehensive geriatric assessment.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This product has been used to teach 2 geriatric faculty, 3 geriatric fellows, several FM residents, and 2 social workers in an ambulatory geriatric clinic.

Date posted: 
Mon, 11/06/2006
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 03/01/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . FEEBLE FALLERS ARE FRAIL (Acronym for domains in comprehensive geriatric assessment). POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2006 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/224

Virtual Patient Case #1: Mr. Karl Andrews - Chief Diagnosis: Atherosclerosis

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

Virtual Patient Case #1 is the first in a five part series. This is a CD-ROM containing short video clips of Mr. Andrews from age 65 to age 80. The clips show progression of patient wellness and disease, highlighting ADL's, CAD, genetics, impotence, obesity, peripheral arterial disease, pharmacology, prevention/screening, stroke and rehabilitation. Also included are screening tests, radiograph images, still pictures and reports providing an array of resources for instructors to use in incorporating geriatrics into their teaching. To facilitate access to these audio/visual resources, the files are indexed by basic science courses, clinical rotations, and an additional 50+ other topics. This individual Virtual Patient case for Mr. Andrews can be downloaded above (click Mr Andrews CD Image). Once you have downloaded the CD image, follow the instructions below. The Virtual Patient Cases can also be purchased individually or as a series. For more information, please visit our website at http://www.mcw.edu/display/docid596/GeriatricsCurr....

Educational objectives: 

To integrate the AGS's Basic Competencies for Care of Older Patients (Attitudes, Knowledge, Skills) as a longitudinal thread throughout the medical student curriculum or in discrete teaching interactions by adding these case-based image resources to existing instruction. Particular emphasis focuses on: 1) Cerebrovascular Disease 2) Diabetes Mellitus 3) Ethical Issues 4) Obesity 5) Peripheral Arterial Disease Geriatric patients are a wonderful resource for illustrating key basic science and clinical concepts. By incorporating these learning objects into your instructional materials, we hope to achieve our ultimate goal: to provide needed exposure to issues commonly encountered with aging patients not only acutely, but life long. We hope that these easily accessible learning objects will enable you to use your creativity as a teacher to make our "virtual patients" come alive, thereby improving the care for geriatric patients.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This CD-ROM allows the instructor to incorporate case-based images for specific teaching needs. This case was created for use with medical students. It could also be used with practicing physicians. Learning environments where this case could be used include the Classroom, a Focus Group, Image Source File, Small Groups, Case Studies INSTRUCTIONS Using a .iso Disk Image file you downloaded from POGOe: A file with the extension '.iso', of which many are available for download with various POGOe products, is a replica of a CD saved on the hard drive. These are often called CD Images or Disk Images. This is a common way to distribute software over the internet that normally comes on a CD. Unfortunately on Windows operating systems, including Windows XP and Windows Vista, you cannot simply click a Disk Image file and open it like a CD. Follow these instructions to access the contents of the .iso file. Mac OsX -------------- Just Click the file and it opens like it was a CD. Windows ------------- 1) Burn the image to a CD using burning software. (To do, insert instructions for how to do that with windows explorer.) Then eject and reinsert the CD. or 2) Install software that treat .iso files as if they were a CD and let you access them from your hard drive. Search on the internet for these tools. Such as this Microsoft Product(http://download.microsoft.com/download/7/b/6/7b6ab...) , or other ones that we have used are Iso Recorder (free) and Power Iso. As of 3-12-2009 you could find a list of Vista compatible free tools with reviews here (http://www.petri.co.il/mount_iso_files_in_windows_...). All Operating Systems ------------------------------ Once you can access the contents in the .iso file, if the program does not start automatically, check the notes in the product page or in the files within the Disk Image for instructions on how to launch the program.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

The development and implementation of the virtual patient CD-ROMS has been described in: Duthie E, Simpson D, Marcdante K, Kerwin D, Denson K, Cohan M. A Collaborative Strategy for Reciprocal Integration of Basic and Clinical Sciences. The Journal of the International Association of Medical Science Educators, 2004; 14(1):34-38. They were also presented at the annual meetings of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine, The Society of General Medicine, and the American Geriatrics Society. The CD-ROMS have also been accepted by the STFM Bookstore following peer review. MedEd Portal

Date posted: 
Tue, 08/25/2009
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 06/06/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Virtual Patient Case #1: Mr. Karl Andrews - Chief Diagnosis: Atherosclerosis. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2009 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/224

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