The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Family Medicine

Elder Abuse 101 for Clinicians

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Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

A 60-slide PowerPoint presentation with notes pages for non-geriatricians. This slide lecture presentation is designed for California-based physicians in training and health care providers seeking continuing education. The length can range from 40 to 55 minutes according to the audience and its interests.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

The information contained in this teaching module is designed to aid providers in making decisions about appropriate care of older adults. The content is intended to be an introduction to the subject of elder abuse. Any guidelines should not be construed as dictating an exclusive course of treatment of procedure. Variations in practice may be warranted based on the needs of the individual patient, resources, and limitations unique to the type of practice or institution.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

One of the contributors, Ronald Chez MD, incorporated some of the content he co-authored in learning modules produced by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Date posted: 
Tue, 01/27/2009
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 10/19/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Elder Abuse 101 for Clinicians. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2009 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/201

CHAMP (Curriculum for the Hospitalized Aging Medical Patient): WOUND CARE

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Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

The "Wound Care" module is part of the CHAMP faculty development program, which aims to improve inpatient, geriatric medical care through a "teach the teacher" approach. It is central to one of the four course themes, preventing hazards of hospitalization. Teaching materials available on the CHAMP webpage link include: slide presentation; a pocket teaching card; sample session evaluation form; CHAMP overview/user's guide; and access to the entire CHAMP course and all teaching resources.

CHAMP is a multi-tiered educational project with a faculty development program at its core. Hospitalists, general internists, and family practitioners who teach residents and medical students are the targeted audience. The course is organized around four themes in geriatric inpatient care: identifying and assessing vulnerable elders, preventing hazards of hospitalization, improving palliative and end of life care, and managing transitions of care. CHAMP addresses 15 geriatric topics and includes a mini-course entitled, "Teaching on Today's Wards," on advanced clinical teaching skills and teaching across the ACGME Core Competencies in the inpatient setting.

1 category CME credit hour was awarded to faculty who attended this teaching session.

Educational objectives: 

CHAMP "Wound Care" module trains learners to:

  1. Routinely perform a complete skin examination in hospitalized older adult patients.
  2. Perform a wound evaluation at bedside on teaching rounds.
  3. Formulate an effective plan of wound care, including a prognosis for healing.
  4. Recognize harmful or ineffective management techniques for wound care.
  5. Include wound care and prevention in the problem list and management plan.
  6. Appreciate the magnitude of the cost and care burden of chronic wounds.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Cumbler, E. (2009, October). Curriculum for the hospitalized aging medical patient review. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 57(10), 1915-1916. Also available online.

Date posted: 
Mon, 03/30/2009
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 07/27/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
CHAMP (Curriculum for the Hospitalized Aging Medical Patient): WOUND CARE. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2009 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/201

Educational Measurement Workshop: A Sweet Approach to Understanding the Basic Principles of Educational Measurement

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Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

Increasingly, medical educators are expected to design, implement, and analyze the results of an array of learner assessment strategies ranging from multiple choice examinations to human (e.g., standardized patients) and mechanical simulations. However, many of our faculty have limited training focused on the core principles of educational measurement and learner assessment.

These principles, including reliability, validity, and sources of errors (e.g., rater biases, administration) are presented in a 2.5-3 hour workshop using chocolate as a central focus. During this memorable and engaging workshop, participants identify key attributes of excellence (in chocolate), develop rating scales, train raters, rate the chocolates, and then report their scores to examine rater consistency. At the conclusion of the workshop, the basic principles of educational measurement and the methods to control common sources of error (e.g., instrumentation) are addressed and discussed in the context of common learner assessment methods.

Educational objectives: 

The learner will be able to:

  1. Define basic terminology associated with educational measurement and learner assessment including reliability, validity, inter-rater agreement, normative, and criterion based assessment.
  2. Identify common sources of measurement errors that threaten the integrity of learner assessment measures.
  3. Identify strategies to correct/control for errors with particular emphasis on those attributable to raters and instrumentation.
  4. Apply measurement principles to address medical education related learner assessment issues.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 
  1. Instructor needs strong background and medical education-related working knowledge of the basic principles of educational measurement and associated methods to control common sources of error.
  2. Ability to draw on examples from a range of specialties/disciplines and training levels including facility with
    • ACGME Competencies, Assessment Requirements for Accreditation and Toolkit;
    • USMLE and credentialing boards (e.g., ABIM).
  3. Teaching Skills for Skilled/experienced large group instructor:
    • Ability to instruct using Microsoft Office PowerPoint software.
    • Ability to interact and facilitate large discussion with learners across specialties.
    • Ability to promote small group interaction, monitor time on task, and direct tasks as needed to stay within schedule.
    • Prepare materials and room or be flexible to use established room set-up.

We use a common, universally familiar subject (chocolate) as the target of performance assessment so participants focus on the instrumentation issues. Since multiple sources of variation and error (e.g., inter-rater taste preferences, rater fatigue) exist even with as simple a construct as chocolate, we provide concrete examples of these as threats to assessment validity. Because the assessment is relatively brief, we are able to quickly summarize the data and interpret simple test statistics (e.g., inter-rater reliability) on the spot. You could have a staff person help with collection of rating forms and quick summary of data while discussion of common errors ensues.

The presenter must continually speak to the relevance and transfer of the material to medical student education. If the participants are not well known to the instructor, a brief introduction of their roles and assessment responsibilities might help make the lessons personal. Variability in chocolates will serve as sources of variation in the discussion - some anticipated, some not (like students). While participants are sampling the chocolates, instructors should identify sources of variability by the three of the four sources of error used to ground the workshop: instrumentation (clarify of rating scales); raters (fatigue, bias' towards a particular chocolate, contamination with another food/drink source); administration (clarity of instructions, order of tasting, chocolate sample size) and any other sources that will introduce error in the measurement. These observations are then used during the discussion (order, size, style of sampling, drinks).

To help learners transfer this information to their faculty roles, find relevant examples of assessment tools from one's own institution. We use a detailed Likert scale rating form in our clinical clerkship that serves as an example and have participants reflect on possible applications of this material in their own jobs.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Simpson DE, Meurer LN: A "Sweet Approach" to Understanding Basic Principles of Educational Measurement. Society for Teachers of Family Medicine Annual Meeting, Denver, Colorado; April 2001.

Date posted: 
Wed, 02/28/2018
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 02/28/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . Educational Measurement Workshop: A Sweet Approach to Understanding the Basic Principles of Educational Measurement. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2018 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/201

The Educator's Portfolio & Curriculum Vitae Workshop & Resource Guide

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Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

Faculty seeking to advance in their academic careers with an emphasis on education often struggle with how to document their educational contributions in traditional academic curriculum vitas (CVs) and Educator's Portfolios (EPs). Submission contains annotated PowerPoint slides, worksheets for the Developing Your Educator's Portfolio, an Instructor's Guide, and a resource guide presenting samples of successful educator-focused CVs and associated EPs demonstrating "effective presentation" strategies consistent with Glassick's criteria for scholarship. 

Educational objectives: 

The learner will be able to:

  1. Identify types of educator-related activities (e.g. curriculum development, teaching, administration) and associated evidence consistent with the quantity, quality and engagement in educational community needed for academic promotion.
  2. Examine the format of the standard CV and a CV adapted specifically for educators and actual examples to determine how to effectively incorporate education into a traditional CV format.
  3. Recognize that effective presentation of educator activities and associated audiences draws on one's teaching skills to select presentation formats that match objectives and intended audience and can be included in the Educator's Portfolio.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Consistent with the findings from the AAMC Consensus Conference on Educational Scholarship, this session highlights key features associated with effective documentation and presentation of educators' contributions for academic promotion. Examples are provided to illustrate how to effectively document quantity and quality of educational activities and engagement with community of educators. The resource guide includes a standard academic CV format, an expanded CV format used by educators, seven paired promotion CVs/EPs and additional samples of EPs to highlight selected topics (e.g., grants, community-academic partnerships). The examples allow users to identify someone "who looks like them", thereby teaching how to document educational activities through role modeling/examples. While the CV/EP examples are timeless, updated references are provided in an accompanying instructor's guide.

As indicated in the Instructor's Guide, presenters of the workshop, Teaching Others About Your Excellence as an Educator, should have a strong working knowledge of educational scholarship, understand local promotion and tenure processes, and be familiar with peer-reviewed repositories. The resource guide of CV and EP templates and actual samples is self-explanatory.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Simpson, D., Marcdante, K., Duthie, E., et al. (2000). Valuing Education Scholarship at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Academic Medicine 75: 930-934.
Simpson D, Marcdante K, et al. 15 Years of Aligning Faculty Development with Primary Care Clinician-Educator Roles and Academic Advancement at the Medical College of Wisconsin Academic Medicine 2006:81(11):945-953. 

Date posted: 
Mon, 02/25/2008
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sat, 12/11/2010
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . The Educator's Portfolio & Curriculum Vitae Workshop & Resource Guide. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2008 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/201

CHAMP Pocket Teaching Cards

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Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

CHAMP Pocket Teaching Cards are designed for faculty learners to assist them in teaching geriatric topics at bedside in the inpatient setting. These 1-2 page teaching tools summarize key teaching points and provide reference materials on the following topics: Advance directives and the DNR Discussion, Delirium, Dementia, Foley Catheter Use, Ideal Hospital Discharge, Pain Control, and Wound Care.

CHAMP Pocket Teaching Cards were created as part of the CHAMP faculty development program, which aims to improve inpatient, geriatric medical care through a "teach the teacher" approach. These materials complement primary teaching resources such as slide presentations with speaker's notes; bedside teaching triggers; and references. Resources on all CHAMP topics and a course overview/program user's guide and evaluation instruments are also available on this website.

CHAMP is a multi-tiered educational project with a faculty development program at its core. Hospitalists, general internists, and family practitioners who teach residents and medical students are the targeted audience. The course is organized around four themes in geriatric inpatient care: identifying and assessing vulnerable elders, preventing hazards of hospitalization, improving palliative and end of life care, and managing transitions of care. CHAMP addresses 15 geriatric topics and includes a mini-course entitled, "Teaching on Today's Wards," on advanced clinical teaching skills and teaching across the ACGME Core Competencies in the inpatient setting.

Educational objectives: 

CHAMP Pocket Teaching Cards enable faculty learners to:

  1. Identify key teaching points on select topics in the care of hospitalized older adult patients.
  2. Discuss guidelines for assessment, evaluation, and treatment around a variety of common geriatric issues facing hospitalized older adult patients.
Date posted: 
Mon, 08/31/2009
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 01/18/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , and . CHAMP Pocket Teaching Cards. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2009 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/201

Web-Based Module to Train and Assess Competency in Systems-Based Practice

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Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

Purpose of the study: The ACGME competency of systems-based practice seeks to increase residents' understanding of the health care system and to train them in the efficient and effective utilization of resources within this system. We developed an interactive, internet-based 30-minute module to train medical residents in the delivery of optimal care to patients by helping them navigate the complex maze of health care resources and to make transitions of care more seamless. The key curricular components of this training module are: 1) the basic elements of Medicare and Medicaid, 2) the various levels of post-acute hospital care for older patients, and 3) the role of provider-to-provider and provider-to-patient communication in patient transitions of care, including the critical elements of an effective discharge summary. Methods: We created an interactive, animated module based on the story of an older patient who presents to an emergency room with focal weakness after a recent hospital stay. It depicts a common scenario that illustrates the importance of communication in the transition of an older patient from one site of care to another. The vignette has been tailored to be applicable to multidisciplinary trainees. Interactive questions are embedded within the case to emphasize key teaching points while continuing to engage the learners.

Educational objectives: 

Specific learning objectives addressed in this module include: 1) The critical elements of an effective discharge summary. 2) How effective discharge communication improves patient outcomes. 3) Basic features of Medicare and Medicaid. 4) How intensity of interventions and support varies, depending on the site of care.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Presented at the 5th Harvard Medical School Medical Education Day, November 7, 2006. 

Eskildsen, M. A. (2010, December). Review of Web-Based Module to Train and Assess Competency in Systems-Based Practice. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 58(12), 2412-2413. Also available online.

Date posted: 
Fri, 09/04/2009
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 09/04/2009
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , , , and . Web-Based Module to Train and Assess Competency in Systems-Based Practice. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2009 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/201

Patient Centered Care Workshop: Providing Quality Health Care to a Diverse Population

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Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

Educators have recently been challenged to actively incorporate instruction that emphasizes cultural diversity, access to health care/health care disparities, evidence-based medicine, and reflection regarding impact of physician's values and beliefs on the patient care. Framing these issues as a 3-perspective approach to patient-centered care (PCC), this 2-part workshop is designed teach learners how to incorporate the patient's, physician's and society's perspective into a health care plan (Part 1) and to provide opportunities for learners to apply the approach using a series of strategically crafted instructor-authored cases and at least one student generated "critical incident" case scenario (Part 2). More specifically, our 3-perspective PCC approach requires learners to consider the physician's role and perspectives (e.g., bio-psychosocial model of care, evidence based medicine, values and beliefs), the patient perspectives organized by the Kleinman questions, and the social review of systems (e.g., societal and economic barriers to health care) when developing patient treatment plans. Suitable for medical students, residents or practicing physicians this workshop can be adapted from its 4-hour format into smaller units. Packet contains a detailed instructor and facilitator guides, PowerPoint slides with speaker notes, cases, critical incident and workshop evaluation forms, and references needed to lead the workshop.

Educational objectives: 

The learner will be able to:

  1. Continuously apply the Kleinman questions to elicit each patient's perspectives on health, disease, illness, and treatment.
  2. Identify physician perspectives and values that influence patient care management including the biomedical model, evidence-based medicine, and physician beliefs.
  3. Identify societal factors including racial, ethnic and socio-economic barriers to and disparities in health care.
  4. Incorporate the patient, physician and societal perspectives into a treatment plan.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

An ABC Nightline video was used in Part 1 of the workshop and must be purchased for us. It was not rated by learners as an essential component of the workshop, but it provided a nice compliment to the lecture-based overview of the PCC model focusing on physician values/biases and societal perspectives. A medical student provided part of the overview session establishing peer creditably but again was not seen as essential. Small group facilitators were a key aspect of the workshop and were effectively oriented through the facilitator guide and a brief orientation session immediately preceding the workshop. Having two facilitators, a physician and non-physician (e.g., member of the health profession) was effective but not essential given the format/structured nature of the case discussion. Other details regarding implementation plans (e.g., facilities, readings, duplication of case materials/handouts) are detailed in the Instructor Guide.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

MedEd Portal

Date posted: 
Mon, 08/31/2009
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sat, 10/27/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , , , and . Patient Centered Care Workshop: Providing Quality Health Care to a Diverse Population. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2009 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/201

Coding 101

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Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Abstract: 

Coding 101 is an online curriculum designed for residents. The curriculum includes three audio-visual modules and suggested supplementary online resources. While the audiovisual modules can be viewed in any order, they are designed for progressive learning in a suggested viewing order. Each module contains learning objectives for Systems Based Practice, an ACGME general competency. Within each module, learning points are identified for PGY1-3 progressive learning. The first module, Coding Fundamentals, provides an overview of ICD, CPT, HCPCS, and medical necessity rules. The second module, E&M Coding, provides guided examples of outpatient E&M coding using 1995 and 1997 rules. The third module, Beyond the Basics, introduces modifier -25, teaching modifiers -GE/GC, coding for counseling time, preventive care coding, and other miscellaneous topics. Supplementary suggested content allows learners to link to the Medicare 1995/1997 documents, the CMS Evaluation and Management Services Guide, and other coding resources. The overall curriculum is appropriate for any resident, 4th year ambulatory students, fellows, and even faculty. All resources are contained on one webpage. The webpage contains links to the following: Coding 101, Part 1: Coding Fundamentals [original production by Davoren Chick, MD; Coding 101, Part 2: E&M Coding [original production by Davoren Chick, MD]; Coding 101, Part 3: Beyond the Basics [original production by Davoren Chick, MD]; link is provided to the ACP guide to frequently used ICD-9-CM codes; link is provided to a brief overview of HCPCS; link is provided to the Evaluation and Management Services Guide produced by CMS; link is provided to a review of the Medicare IPPE exam by thecodingcenter.org; links are provided to the CMS 1995 and 1997 documentation guidelines for evaluation and management services.

Educational objectives: 

1. Origins and usages of ICD-9-CM codes 2. Origins and usages of CPT codes 3. HCPCS federal codes 4. The medical necessity rule 5. The definition of a "new" patient 6. History E&M key component and its three sub-areas 7. Physical exam E&M key component, with 1995 and 1997 documentation 8. Medical decision making key component and its three sub-areas 9. Documentation rules for new and established outpatients 10. Modifier 25 11. Preventive care coding options, including the IPPE 12. Smoking cessation counseling codes 13. GC and GE teaching modifiers

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Because the videos are in Windows Media format, they are best viewed from an Internet Explorer web browser on a PC that has Windows Media Player (WMP). A link is provided to connect learners to the microsoft download center where a free copy of WMP can be accessed for any Windows or Mac system. From standard windows PCs, learners may use the table of contents hotlink bars visible to the left of the video in order to jump to different topics if they desire. Using a Mac or web browsers other than Internet Explorer, learners can view the videos as designed (in a progressive manner) but may not be able to jump between sections using the table of contents bars. In such cases, the forward and backward arrows and sliding bar of WMP still allow learners to repeat or skip sections as desired. For all systems, audio output is required. Audio is best quality using headphones or speakers but is sufficient using only a laptop audio feed. Please note that while the content is not likely to be irrelevant or obsolete in 3-5 years, coding rules do evolve. The material will be updated if necessary but CMS regulations will always be the only legal source for new coding regulations.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Internal presentations only. Citation Formats: NLM: Chick D, Coding 101. MedEdPORTAL; 2007. Available from: http://services.aamc.org/jsp/mededportal/retrieveS... APA: Chick, D., (2007). Coding 101. MedEdPORTAL: http://services.aamc.org/jsp/mededportal/retrieveS... MedEd Portal

Date posted: 
Tue, 08/25/2009
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 08/25/2009
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Coding 101. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2009 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/201

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