The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Patient Safety

Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Chronic Urinary Catheters - Troubleshooting Blockage

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Chronic Urinary Catheters - Troubleshooting Blockage is one of a continuing series of practical, evidence based, Provider Fact Sheets which summarize key geriatric topics and provide clinically useful assessments and interventions. Initially developed for remote, rural clinical sites, they are useful for students and health care professionals from many fields and across a very broad range of health care settings.

Educational objectives: 

After reading this issue of Elder Care, you should be able to…

  1. List the common causes of urinary catheter blockage
  2. Evaluate patients with a blocked catheter to determine the cause
  3. Take steps to manage and eliminate catheter blockage
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Subscribers to POGOe are free to reprint Elder Care on their own stationery or in other publications without obtaining specific permission, so long as:

  1. Content is not changed,
  2. No one is charged a fee to use or read the publication,
  3. Authors and their affiliated institutions are noted without change, and
  4. The reprint includes the following statement: “Reprinted courtesy of the Arizona Reynolds Program of Applied Geriatrics and the Arizona Geriatrics Workforce Enhancement Program”.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

The Elder Care provider sheets are occasionally published in the Arizona Geriatrics Society Journal, which is published twice yearly.

Nelson, D. and Medina-Walpole, A. (2010, December), Elder care provider fact sheets. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 58(12), 2414-2415. Also available online.

Date posted: 
Wed, 07/17/2019
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 06/25/2019
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Chronic Urinary Catheters - Troubleshooting Blockage. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2019 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1089

Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Suicide Prevention for Older Adults

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Suicide Prevention for Older Adults is one of a continuing series of practical, evidence based, Provider Fact Sheets which summarize key geriatric topics and provide clinically useful assessments and interventions. Initially developed for remote, rural clinical sites, they are useful for students and health care professionals from many fields and across a very broad range of health care settings.

Educational objectives: 

After reading this issue of Elder Care, you should be able to…

  1. List risk factors for suicide in older adults
  2. Identify warning signs that suicidal patients may demonstrate during clinical encounters
  3. Take steps to lessen the chance of suicide when a patient is identified as being at risk
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Subscribers to POGOe are free to reprint Elder Care on their own stationery or in other publications without obtaining specific permission, so long as:

  1. Content is not changed,
  2. No one is charged a fee to use or read the publication,
  3. Authors and their affiliated institutions are noted without change, and
  4. The reprint includes the following statement: “Reprinted courtesy of the Arizona Reynolds Program of Applied Geriatrics and the Arizona Geriatrics Workforce Enhancement Program”.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

The Elder Care provider sheets are occasionally published in the Arizona Geriatrics Society Journal, which is published twice yearly.

Nelson, D. and Medina-Walpole, A. (2010, December), Elder care provider fact sheets. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 58(12), 2414-2415. Also available online.

Date posted: 
Mon, 04/08/2019
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 03/15/2019
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Suicide Prevention for Older Adults. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2019 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1089

Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Community Resources

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Community Resources is one of a continuing series of practical, evidence based, Provider Fact Sheets which summarize key geriatric topics and provide clinically useful assessments and interventions. Initially developed for remote, rural clinical sites, they are useful for students and health care professionals from many fields and across a very broad range of health care settings.

Educational objectives: 

After reading this issue of Elder Care, you should be able to…

  1. Explain what are Area Agencies on Aging
  2. Provide older adults and their families and caregivers with contact information for community resources that might be useful to them
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Subscribers to POGOe are free to reprint Elder Care on their own stationery or in other publications without obtaining specific permission, so long as:

  1. Content is not changed,
  2. No one is charged a fee to use or read the publication,
  3. Authors and their affiliated institutions are noted without change, and
  4. The reprint includes the following statement: “Reprinted courtesy of the Arizona Reynolds Program of Applied Geriatrics and the Arizona Geriatrics Workforce Enhancement Program”.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

The Elder Care provider sheets are occasionally published in the Arizona Geriatrics Society Journal, which is published twice yearly.

Nelson, D. and Medina-Walpole, A. (2010, December), Elder care provider fact sheets. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 58(12), 2414-2415. Also available online.

Date posted: 
Mon, 04/08/2019
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 03/15/2019
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Community Resources. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2019 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1089

Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Ethnic, Racial, and Cultural Perceptions in End-of-Life Issues

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Ethnic, Racial, and Cultural Perceptions in End-of-Life Issues is one of a continuing series of practical, evidence based, Provider Fact Sheets which summarize key geriatric topics and provide clinically useful assessments and interventions. Initially developed for remote, rural clinical sites, they are useful for students and health care professionals from many fields and across a very broad range of health care settings.

Educational objectives: 

After reading this issue of Elder Care, you should be able to…

  1. Define ethnic and cultural identity
  2. State differences between various ethnic/cultural groups in their perceptions of end-of-life issues
  3. Improve your communication about end-of-life issues when discussing these issues with patients from ethnic/cultural groups different than your own
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Subscribers to POGOe are free to reprint Elder Care on their own stationery or in other publications without obtaining specific permission, so long as:

  1. Content is not changed,
  2. No one is charged a fee to use or read the publication,
  3. Authors and their affiliated institutions are noted without change, and
  4. The reprint includes the following statement: “Reprinted courtesy of the Arizona Reynolds Program of Applied Geriatrics and the Arizona Geriatrics Workforce Enhancement Program”.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

The Elder Care provider sheets are occasionally published in the Arizona Geriatrics Society Journal, which is published twice yearly.

Nelson, D. and Medina-Walpole, A. (2010, December), Elder care provider fact sheets. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 58(12), 2414-2415. Also available online.

Date posted: 
Wed, 07/25/2018
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 05/22/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Ethnic, Racial, and Cultural Perceptions in End-of-Life Issues. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2018 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1089

Where's the Fall Risk?

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

One in four older adults have a fall or fall-related injury every year. “Where’s the Fall Risk?” is an interactive educational game that allows learners to discuss falls prevention in the home environment and think of potential solutions. Learners will be in groups of 2-6 people and use the provided picture to circle the fall risk areas in the given amount of time. The teams will then present the total number of areas by room and propose solutions for each fall risk area. A point will be given for each circled area and solution. The discussion portion of the game provides learners the ability to identify and fix high fall risk areas in the home. 

 

Educational objectives: 
  1. Understand what aspects of the home environment are considered fall risks
  2. Think of creative solutions to fix these fall risk areas
  3. At the end of the game, be able to have an active discussion with patients regarding falls prevention in the home environment
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 
Materials:
The game is best played in a group setting with teams composed of about 2-6 people.
  • Diagram of the home environment (PowerPoint provided)
  • Pen/Marker to circle fall risk areas
  • Timer
  • White board to keep track of points
Instructions:
Please print the provided diagram of the home environment. Groups of 2-6 people with a minimum of 2 groups.
Identification Phase:
  1. Set timer for 2 minutes and provide groups with the home diagram
  2. Start timer and have groups circle areas in the home that are considered fall risks. Suggestion to groups: it is easier to go room by room
  3. Once time is up, set pens to the side.
Solution Phase:
  1. Set timer for 2 minutes and provide groups with a sheet of paper.
  2. Start timer and have groups discuss why they circled the area as a fall risk and think of a solution for the fall risk area (of note, groups may not use “get rid of the item” as a solution).
  3. Once time is up, set pens to the side.
Discussion Phase:
  1. On white board, create a grid with group names at the top and rooms on the side (“Outside”, “Living Room”, “Kitchen”, “Dining”, “Bedroom”, “Bathroom”)
    1. Depending on how much time you have, it may be faster to discuss some rooms together: Outside & Living Room, Kitchen & Dining, Bedroom & Bathroom
  2. Start the discussion by going from room to room. Each team will get 1 point if they can identify a fall risk area and provide a solution. Of note, this is a key opportunity to discuss and talk about these high fall risk areas. You may propose other solutions and open it up to discussion with other groups as well.
  3. The winning team has the most points at the end of the game. 
Date posted: 
Wed, 07/25/2018
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sat, 05/26/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Where's the Fall Risk?. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2018 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1089

ACUTE MANAGEMENT OF OLDER ADULT FOUND DOWN WITH ALTERED MENTAL STATUS

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

This case study was developed for use in academic coursework and as a standalone training for health care providers (MDs, ARNP, Pharmacists, Social Workers, Nurses). This unfolding case study about the management of an older adult in the midst of a health crisis. This case is a composite of many actual cases seen in Emergency Departments. During the course of this case study, learners are presented with information as the providers learn of the patient’s emergent and ongoing health concerns – from her Emergency Department admission through her Intensive Care Unit stay. Learners are asked to make decisions and use their best judgment about how to care for this patient.

Educational objectives: 

 

  • Apply knowledge of evidence-based care provision to an older adult found with altered mental status after a ground level fall
  • Describe the contributions of the interprofessional team to care management
  • Demonstrate effective communication during handoffs in care
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Citations are listed at the bottom of the screen throughout the case study.

Date posted: 
Fri, 07/27/2018
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 05/22/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
ACUTE MANAGEMENT OF OLDER ADULT FOUND DOWN WITH ALTERED MENTAL STATUS. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2018 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1089

Interprofessional Didactic on Medication Reconciliation for Medical and Pharmacy Students

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Introduction
Medical schools are now required to include interprofessional training in which students collaborate with other healthcare professionals. This interprofessional didactic session was created by a pharmacist and physicians to teach a group of medical and pharmacy students about medication reconciliation.
Methods
A physician and pharmacist collaborated to deliver this 50-minute PowerPoint didactic during second-year medical students’ clinical skills course. Participating students included second-year medical students at the author’s institution, plus all pharmacy students rotating at the institution on the day of the didactic, since the author’s institution does not have its own pharmacy school. The didactic consists of lecturing, interprofessional small group work on cases, and large group discussion. Students were surveyed after the didactic to assess their attitudes about the session.
Results
A total of 63 students (54 medical and 9 pharmacy students) attended this didactic. Survey response rate was 58/63 (92%). On a 5-point Likert scale (1=Strongly Disagree, 5=Strongly Agree), students generally agreed that the lecture was valuable (mean +/- SD 4.7 +/- 0.5), provided new information (4.4 +/- 0.7), and should be continued for future students (4.7 +/- 0.5). Students also agreed that their school should have more interprofessional didactics (4.6 +/- 0.6).
Discussion
This 50-minute interprofessional didactic for medical and pharmacy students was highly valued by students, and provides a valuable setting for interprofessional education. This interprofessional didactic can be replicated at other institutions, including medical schools that do not have an on-site pharmacy school.

Educational objectives: 

By the end of this activity, learners will be able to:
1. Appreciate the difficulties many patients have with taking medications appropriately.
2. Describe how to approach patients in a collaborative, nonthreatening manner about their medications.
3. Identify how to appropriately obtain and document a patient’s complete medication list.
4. Appreciate the importance of maintaining an accurate medication list during times of transitions of care.
5. Appreciate the value of interprofessional learning.

Date posted: 
Thu, 02/15/2018
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 02/15/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Interprofessional Didactic on Medication Reconciliation for Medical and Pharmacy Students. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2018 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1089

Medication Management

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

The Medication Management Module uses a team approach to reduce error and improve the quality of health care for older adults. This interdisciplinary formative assessment tool for Elder Safety can be utilized by fourth-year medical students, residents in training, practicing physicians and other medical professionals. Learners will take a pre-test, review learning objectives, exemplar and video demonstrations, have access to reference materials and links to websites for Medication Management. Physicians and other healthcare providers will be able to establish a protocol for medication management in their practice to reduce medication errors and misadventures. 

Educational objectives: 

1. Understand the impact of medication errors and adverse drug events 

2. Be able to establish an evidence based standardized protocol for medication reconciliation

3. Access evidence based resources and methods for medication management

4. Learn the components of a comprehensive medication history

5. Comprehend the necessity for a standaarized protocol for medication reconciliation

6.  Geriatric specialists provide a Medication Management focus on three target areas: Pain Management, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular

 

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

To access the material, go to the Learning Center at https://www.ilearn.nbome.org to access the Elder Safety Modules:

  • Select your learning activity (Medication Management) and addit to your cart.
  • In the cart, click Proceed to Checkout. this will prompt you to either create a new account or login to your exisitng one.
  • Create your free account by entering the required information.
  • Once completed you will be directed back to the catalog to complete your course registration.
  • There is No Charge for viewing the Advance Care Plan Module.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Marquez-Hall, S., Horber, D. (2017) Web-based formative assessment: An innovative way to assess and improve physician/patient care using an interprofessional team approach. Joint presentation with the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners at the American Association of Osteopathic Medicine and Association of Osteopathic Directors and Medical Educators Annual Conference, Baltimore, MD

Date posted: 
Tue, 01/16/2018
Product Viewing Instructions: 
Information for accessing the Elder Safety Modules can be found in the Additional Details Section.
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Medication Management. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2018 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1089

Compendium of Five Case Studies: Lessons for Interprofessional Teamwork in Education and Workplace Learning Environments

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

The VA Centers of Excellence in Primary Care Education began educational activities in Academic Year 2011-2012 to improve primary care education, particularly to harmonize the education of clinician trainees with the emerging and future practice of primary care exemplified by patient centered care such as VA’s Patient Aligned Care Team model for primary care delivery. This volume shares examples of educational strategies that have
emerged from the first four academic years of the project, with each chapter being a case study from a participating site. Each case study reports on the implementation of a curricular element within their unique Center of Excellence. These case studies are intended to be of use to those interested in introducing curricular activities in accredited programs for health profession trainees that will lead to
the advancement of interprofessional, Veteran/patient-centered primary care. These case studies also represent one component of the project’s evaluation plan, designed by Annette Gardner, Ph.D. We have attempted to inform readers about the context of the institutions and readiness for change, the steps each program completed to design and develop strategies, gain leadership commitments,
implement, and evaluate these interventions in the spirit of continuous improvement. Additional reports about the project have been published, are in press, or are in the pipeline. Further, many of the references in this document have full-text available online. We have provided live links for ease of access to these additional resources.

Educational objectives: 

Shared Decision-Making: Care is aligned with the values, preferences and cultural perspectives of the patient. Curricula focus is on communication skills necessary to promote patient’s self-efficacy.


Sustained Relationships: Care is designated to promote continuity of care; curricula focus on longitudinal learning relationships.


Interprofessional Collaboration: Care is team based, efficient and coordinated, curricula focus is on developing trustful, collaborative relationships.


Performance Improvement: Care is designed to optimize the health of populations; curricula focus on using the methodology of continuous improvement in redesigning care to achieve quality outcomes.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Centers of Excellence in Primary Care Education (2017). Compendium of Five Case Studies: Lessons for Interprofessional Teamwork in Education and Workplace Learning Environments 2011-2016 (S. Gilman & L. Traylor Eds.): United States Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of Academic Affiliations. ISBN: 978-0-16-094202-0

Date posted: 
Wed, 05/16/2018
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 05/16/2018
Product Viewing Instructions: 
Download Adobe pfd file
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Compendium of Five Case Studies: Lessons for Interprofessional Teamwork in Education and Workplace Learning Environments. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2018 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1089

Advance Directives

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Advance Care Planning (ACP) is more than documenting life-sustaining treatment choices or identifying a surrogate decision-maker; it is a comprehensive, continuing communication and ‘shared decision-making’ process between the patient, family, and medical providers designed to document patient values and goals for treatment.

This interactive self- learning module is designed for undergraduate medical students with the goal of introducing learners to ACP while building their confidence in facilitating difficult conversations with patients. At the beginning of the module, we provide background on ACP including the challenges and benefits associated with the process. We showcase an elderly couple discussing how important it is to have advance directives in place. The second portion of the module reviews the common forms that are used to document advance directives and two patient case scenarios where the students can interact and reflect on the acquired content.

Educational objectives: 
  • Recognize the relevance in conducting and documenting advance directive discussions with patients.
  • List commonly used advance directives documents.
  • Develop the skills necessary to engage patients in a discussion about advance directives through the use of realistic patient case scenarios.
     
Date posted: 
Wed, 07/19/2017
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sun, 07/19/2020
Product Viewing Instructions: 
Interactive self learning module
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Advance Directives. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2017 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1089

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